.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Work of Art: I just had to send this to you

    Imagine receiving a letter so eye-catching that it makes you want to send a copy to 100 friends. But wait! With postage costing $44, not to mention the price of paper, envelopes and ink, well that starts to run into money.

    The only time I succumbed to such expenditures was in 1972, when an acquaintance whom I met at a workshop in Charlottesville, Va., sent me a letter with the notation “This one really works!” with the urging that I send copies of the letter to 25 friends.

  • Publisher's Note: Love of country, community

    The national discourse, as well as a little local talk I’ve heard lately, got me to thinking about patriotism. And love of community. Let me start with our views of the U.S., then bring it on home.

  • Nuestra Historia - Don Miguel arrives, a dynasty is born

    For almost seven decades beginning in the 1860s, one family would dominate the social, financial and political landscape of Las Vegas and San Miguel County.  Their influence would be felt throughout  New Mexico, and would not end until the late 1920s.

    The sons of this Las Vegas dynasty would represent territorial New Mexico in Congress, and help ensure that New Mexico was admitted to the Union.  

  • Orgullo del Norte - The art of covering up history

    “If you tremble indignation at every injustice then you are a comrade of mine.”
    -- Ernesto “Che” Guevara

    When the Spanish conquerors of Mexico burned all the Aztec books, they were eradicating a people’s history. When the American government sent young natives to Indian schools for assimilation, they were eradicating a people’s history.

    By the same token, when you paint over a social, political, or cultural mural, you are eradicating a people’s history.

  • Editorial Roundup

    The Associated Press

    The New York Times, March 29, on President Obama’s explanation for military involvement in Libya:

    President Barack Obama made the right, albeit belated, decision to join with allies and try to stop Moammar Gadhafi from slaughtering thousands of Libyans. But he has been far too slow to explain that decision, or his long-term strategy, to Congress and the American people.

  • Work of Art: Who’s being sensitive?

    It’s happened twice in less than a week: This old man has found himself getting choked up. The older I get, the easier it is to become dewy-eyed.

    Let me explain:

    I delivered a brief eulogy for my father-in-law, Stanley Coppock, in Springer last Thursday. Why me? Why not one of Stanley’s four daughters? Well, to a (wo)man, they emphasized they’d be unable to carry it out — too emotional.

  • Publisher's Note: Reasons to believe

    “Struck me kinda funny, seemed kind of funny sir to me,
    How at the end of every hard earned day people find some reason to believe.”
    — From the song “Reason to Believe” by Bruce Springsteen

    If you’re starting to think that the world is going to hell in a hand basket, I suggest you pick up last week’s Time magazine. There’s a series of articles in there that may lift your spirits considerably.

  • Dulcey Amargo: The issue of social promotion

    We’re all familiar with the phrase, “Biting off more than we can chew.” For the past few weeks I’ve been mulling over that concept, but finally decided to share my viewpoint on the issue prompted by Gov. Susana Martinez and the effort to end social promotion.

    First, let me say that I’m not omniscient; then let me say that a good portion of my career, from 1968 to 2010, was focused upon literacy education as well as developmental education.

  • Nuestra Historia - The Americanization of Old Town Plaza, Part 2

    This is the second of two articles which I invited from resident scholar and historian Marcus C. Gottschalk, who has done extensive primary research concerning the development of the Old Town Plaza. As noted in our previous entry, in 2001 Marcus published Pioneer Merchants of the Old Town Plaza, and we appreciate his contribution to this column.

    By Marcus C. Gottschalk
    Contributor

  • Orgullo del Norte - ‘Tiny’ Martinez and the Brown Berets

    “There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.”
    — Elie Wiesel

    Desperate people have desperate ways. Many groups of color were organized during the 1960s and 70s. The Black Panthers, AIM (American Indian Movement), and the Brown Berets (Chicanos) were the three largest.

    Their common cause had to do with Civil Rights and poverty.