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Columns

  • Publisher's Note: Independent Las Vegas

    Forgive me if I’m being presumptuous, but I just can’t help feeling part of this town’s historical identity, and I’m here to say that Las Vegas is a great place to celebrate the Fourth of July.     

    You want patriotism? We’ve got it in droves. Las Vegas has always provided more than its fair share of fighters of our wars, believers in our causes, and doers for our ideals. We’ve got veterans and peaceniks, each of them standing for what they love about our country, sometimes standing as one and the same.

  • Nuestra Historia - Fiestas!

    Since Las Vegas was founded in 1835, fiestas have been celebrated at the Old Town Plaza, but a Fourth of July celebration did not begin until 1882.

    Before then, grand celebrations were held on the Plaza for traditional Hispanic religious funciones on July 25 and 26, los días de Santiago y Santa Ana (St. James the Greater, patron saint of Spain, and St. Anne, patron saint of mothers and family). These religious feast days have been celebrated by the Hispanic community for centuries, and are still commemorated throughout New Mexico.

  • Orgullo del Norte - Setting the record straight

    Since I began writing Orgullo del Norte, I have received numerous remarks from readers. The vast majority of comments received have been positive.

    However, there are some readers who believe that, politically, I am on the far right and others that think I am on the far left. Some have even come to the assumption that I believe that historically, all whites are racist and have even been asked if I were anti-Spanish.

    Allow me to set the record straight.

  • Publisher's Note: Teenagers: Mixed blessing

    I consider myself an authority on teenagers, even if they consider me an old geezer.
    Believe it or not, I was a teenager myself for several years. Now I’m the father of two teenagers, who have teenage friends who visit my house, eat my food and take away my nights of peaceful slumber.

  • Nuestra Historia - Placitas grew with Las Vegas

    Soon after its founding in 1835, other settlements flourished around Las Vegas, the earliest of these along the Gallinas River south and east of our town.

    These placitas were self-sustaining villages and hamlets, whose early settlers farmed and ranched, many irrigating off the Gallinas River. Most had their own church and cemetery, many of which still exist, and several boasted a general store and, in later years, a post office.  

  • Orgullo del Norte - The Great Depression, traditions and culture

    “Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to that arrogant oligarchy who merely happen to be walking around.”
    — G. K. Chesterton

    The stock market crashed on Oct. 29, 1929. This day became known as Black Tuesday. Wall Street executives and bankers were jumping to their deaths as the masses were being stripped of their savings.

  • Work of Art: Lawn belched, gave thanks

    Going to the plant south of town, on my first trip for a water haul, I counted 18 vehicles, going for or having gotten, a load of effluent water.

    My grandson and namesake, thrilled over his brand-new learner’s permit, took the wheel, while my wife, Bonnie, and I went along for the ride. Arthur’s father recently purchased a 275-gallon container, which surprisingly took only about a minute to fill. We saw pickups the size of ours, some with trailers, as well as huge tankers.

  • Publisher's Note: Festivals, fairs and parades

    It seems as if every town in the good ol’ U.S.A. has some sort of festival. I’ve been to a number of them.

    In Conway, Ark., where I lived and worked for several years, there was Toad Suck Daze, named after a rural area on the banks of the Arkansas River where, legend has it, people would go to suck on bottles of booze “until they swelled up like toads.” The festival has nothing to do with Toad Suck — the closest it comes to the name itself are the toad races — but the name itself has drawn national attention to the festival.

  • Nuestra Historia - The Jesuit College — Part II

    Instruction at the Jesuit College was offered concurrently in both Spanish and English, perhaps making the school one of the first in the country to establish a bilingual curriculum.  

  • Orgullo del Norte -Statehood and the Spanish-American War

    “A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government.”
    — Edward Abbey

    When the American Revolution took place, a large group of people declared war on their home country, their own government, and their fellow countrymen. All those who took up arms against Britain were not called traitors or rebels; they were called “patriots.” This act set the historical bar for what it means to be a patriot.