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Columns

  • Publisher's Note: A history of divisions

    If you haven’t figured it out by now, I have a passion for history. In fact, that’s part of the reason I was drawn to journalism. Newspapers, it’s been said, record “the first draft of history.”

    In 1879, the founder of this newspaper, Russell Kistler, did more than just write the “first draft.” He also made history. Unfortunately, part of his legacy can be found in the divisions that helped define Las Vegas.

  • Work of Art: This calls for collarboration

    As a continuing unrepentant language cop, I really had thought of laying off criticizing those electronic message boards that greet visitors.

    Yes, since it’s summer, when most of the schools are in recess, there hasn’t been much to report. But if there is a bit of criticism, I aim it at the fact that a number of the signs appear to have gone on summer break, along with teachers and students.

  • Publisher's Note: Letters and a columnist

    Sometimes the letters to the editor consume me. Sometimes there are just too many.

    And, sometimes, they are just too good.

    Our last couple days worth of Viewpoints pages are a good example of what I’m talking about. When I started building Friday’s editorial pages last Wednesday, I had a dozen letters in the system ready to run. I got six in on Friday, and three more in today.

  • Nuestra Historia - The railroad bypasses Las Vegas

    By 1871 there existed a transcontinental railroad across the United States, spanning the northern Great Plains, and soon plans were in place to run a rail line to the southwest, roughly along the route of the Santa Fe Trail.  
    Thus was commenced a new railway  from Topeka, Kansas, to Santa Fe. (As early as 1863 the Atchison & Topeka Railroad added Santa Fe to its company name,  when it decided that New Mexico’s capital city would be the southern destination of its rail line.)

  • Work of Art: An idiot’s guide to idioms

    One of the things some of us did on our own, without getting paid, was individual tutoring. During my term on the faculty at Highlands University, some dedicated students, usually Asians, wishing to “rap,” often visited me.

  • Publisher's Note: Another boomer failure?

    One of the greatest accomplishments of the baby boomers is not that we turned race and color into non-issues on the American landscape, but that we raised the generation that might just do it.

    Case in point: The election of Barack Obama, our first African-American president. He was elected with the overwhelming support of young voters — more so than he had with voters over age 50.

  • Dulcey Amargo: It’s not always easy

    Since March of this year, it has seemed a veritable slalom of zigzags placed in the path of Las Vegas City Schools as well as other school district employees.

    It was nice to see that Paul D. Henry Elementary was recognized for its success in student achievement in March. But before long, there was what educationalists designate as “disequilibration,” a term which generally denotes being out of balance.

  • Nuestra Historia - Las Vegas before the A.T.&S.F.

    Las Vegas prospered for almost a half century before the railroad arrived in 1879.

    During that short span beginning in 1835, our town saw expansive growth and change.  Because of its prime location along the Santa Fe Trail, Las Vegas experienced more bustle and flurry than any other place in New Mexico.    

    In the 50 years before the railroad, our town witnessed first-hand the major transformative developments of the time, and more than any other place in New Mexico, Las Vegas was at the crossroads of history.

  • Guest Perspective: A memory of wind, smoke and fire

    By Frances Levine

    Four times in my New Mexico life I’ve smelled the acrid smoke, scanned the roiling skies, and waited anxiously for summer monsoons to quell fires on the Pajarito Plateau.

    The first time  — the summer of 1977 — seared my deepest memories of the damage wildfires can do and how dangerous and strategic the work of fire crews must be.

  • Work of Art: Same stuff, different day

    “You guys keep printing the same news, and you even copy from each other.” There isn’t a newsperson alive who hasn’t needed to refute these charges.

    Most of us have experienced that this-sounds-familiar phenomenon either when reading the paper or listening to the news:  the same word order, the same chronology.