.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Another Perspective: Addressing domestic abuse

    “Prominent resident beaten to death.”       

     “Prominent” was the word that stood out to me reading this headline in the April 6 edition of the Las Vegas Optic. The second jolt was a photo of Sherry Anne Clancy, a woman I knew.  

  • Nuestra Historia - El Distrito de las Escuelas: The Sisters of Loretto

    An organized system of formal education in New Mexico was non-existent until the late 1800s. In fact, when Gov. Albino Pérez proposed a tax levy in 1837 to help fund a system of public education, he was more than just rebuffed — he was beheaded.

  • Orgullo del Norte - The train and the first movemento of El Norte

    “History is a great teacher. Now everyone knows that the labor movement did not diminish the strength of the nation but enlarged it. By raising the living standards of millions, labor miraculously created a market for industry and lifted the whole nation to undreamed of levels of production. Those who attack labor forget these simple truths, but history remembers them.”
    — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

  • Work of Art: Fonazo on el treadmill

    Trinidad Martinez, mentioned in this space a while back, took on ethnographic research for a linguistics class he took a few years ago when Prof. Carol Scates chaired the Highlands University English Department.

    A native of nearby Peñasco, Martinez came up with an impressive list of words which we Spanish speakers in northern New Mexico have adopted. Surely, anyone familiar with the Spanish language has come across any number of words that we’ve somehow made fit.

  • Publisher's Note: Board must prove itself

    When it comes to politics in Las Vegas, the public is always suspicious. A lot of people distrust their elected officials, and they are often justified in their reasons.

    Las Vegas’ history is rife with shady dealmaking,  and often the result has been an accumulation of wealth and power into the hands of a few, while the “rank and file” are left wondering what happened.

  • Nuestra Historia - Temple Montefiore and the Taicherts

    By the late 1800s the Jewish presence in Las Vegas was robust and thriving, with the largest population of German Jews in all New Mexico. Most had become successful merchants and had been joined by extended family members emigrating from their old home lands in western Europe.

  • Orgullo del Norte - Kit Carson: hero or villain?

    “Thanksgiving is nothing but a toast to genocide.”
    — Stephen Evans

    The European invasion on the Americas began with Columbus in 1492. At this time there were an estimated 75 million natives, 25 million in North America.

  • Work of Art: Armageddon tired of waiting

    It would have been great if people who predict the end of the world had been a wee bit more accurate. Even though the prediction of the coming rapture was a few ticks off, it certainly drew a lot of attention.

    Presbyterian Pastor Randy Campbell, for one, opened his Sunday sermon by announcing, “I’m here!” Doubtless many others said the same thing.

  • Publisher's Note: Great debates

    A couple of weeks ago I was asked to be a judge at a series of debates at West Las Vegas High School. What I experienced was both frustrating and inspiring.

    First, the frustration. I found it difficult to sit there without speaking up about the issues under debate. The questions posed were relevant and timely and the wannabe teacher in me wanted to jump into the fray. But I maintained my role and kept quiet — not such an easy thing to do for an inky pundit like me.

  • Another Perspective: Living on the edge

    By Andrew Feldman

    For the Optic

    Our water problem can basically be broken into two parts — water infrastructure (expensive) and actual water supply (scarce). The infrastructure will take a great deal of money to fix. The supply is more uncertain and no amount of money can make it rain or snow. If we fix the infrastructure and do some other innovative things we can hedge our bet against drought.

    In the past when the water situation became dire, previous city administrations would talk, but then it would rain and nothing would get done.