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Columns

  • Work of Art: Overwhelmed by ‘stuff’

    Like many people, we Trujillos have problems with “stuff.” Problems not as in “We can’t get enough stuff,” but as in, “We have simply too much stuff.”
    Let me explain:

    A trip to Samaritan House or Salvation Army is supposed to put our household on a diet: The intention is to take clean, usable stuff to either repository in order to 1) help someone else out, 2) help keep a few people employed and 2) help clear out our own place.

  • Editor's Note: January 10th

    Here’s the latest on who’s running for mayor, or thinking about it, or denying any plans to do so.

    Andrew Feldman’s decision not to run opened up the race. Feldman, a no-nonsense council member for the past four years, had some passionate supporters, many of whom are still asking him to reconsider and jump back into the race. But he says that’s not going to happen. As for who he’ll back, he says, “We’ll see come Jan. 11.”

  • Another Perspective: El mitote

    I used to joke with my mom that she should start publishing a paper in Vegas and call it “El Mitote.”

    She always had the most prime pieces of information about just about everyone I thought was important in town.  

    The thing about my mom is that she is the kind of person that people like to open up to and share the most intimate details of their lives with. Funny thing is, not many people usually do the same for her, except for me, of course.

  • Nuestra Historia - Camp Luna — a proud tradition

    In 1929, Camp Luna was named in honor of Captain Maximiliano Luna, a Rough Rider and hero of the 1898 Spanish-American War, who later lost his life during military service in the Philippines. From a distinguished Valencia County family, Luna was elected speaker of New Mexico’s territorial House of Representatives when he was only 26. (Luna had earlier attended the Jesuit College in Las Vegas.)

  • Work of Art: Fighters followed a code

    It’s a great feeling when someone I know says he remembers the people I wrote about in a previous column.

    “You know this ‘Sopandas’ guy you mentioned? Well, he was my neighbor,” a childhood friend told me recently.

  • Publisher's Note: E-fatigue

    Is this “the beginning of the end” for Facebook?

    According to an article by Ben Bajarin, director of consumer-technology analysis and research at Creative Strategies Inc., it just might be.

    Facebook, with its half-billion users, actually continues to grow in size and scope and impact upon our world, but Bajarin points out that there are other networking sites, like Path and Pinterest, that might just be starting to nip at this social networking behemoth.

  • Nuestra Historia - Bridge, streets and trolleys

    When Las Vegas revelers greeted the arrival of the first train on July 4, 1879, their enthusiasm was confined to Railroad Avenue, unless they chose to ford the river to celebrate at a saloon or hotel on the west side — there was no bridge across the Gallinas.

    After Las Vegas was founded at the Old Town Plaza in 1835, the settlement expanded north, south and west, but not east, and there was no need for a bridge over the river. (The highlands and plains east of the river were used for grazing livestock and some dry farming.)

  • Work of Art: Don’t know much about ...

    A new movie — one I haven’t yet seen, but plan to — is titled “Anonymous.” The subject is about doubts that the works of William Shakespeare — the 37 plays, many sonnets and poems — were written by someone else.

    Purposely, I haven’t delved into the reviews to avoid forming a strong premature opinion, but I will posit that those who say the man from Stratford-Upon-Avon was a fake, an imposter, generally aren’t literary types.

  • Publisher's Note: Perspectives

    Maybe it started with Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper,” the tale of a couple of look-alikes who inadvertently switched identities so that the prince became a pauper and the pauper a prince.

  • Nuestra Historia - ‘We have lost our voice’

    Whether Dennis Chavez would win his first bid for the U.S. Senate in 1934, would be determined in Las Vegas. Election results indicated he had lost to incumbent Republican Bronson Cutting by a mere 1,261 votes statewide, and Chavez contested the election only in San Miguel County.