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Columns

  • Publisher's Note: Perspectives

    Maybe it started with Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper,” the tale of a couple of look-alikes who inadvertently switched identities so that the prince became a pauper and the pauper a prince.

  • Nuestra Historia - ‘We have lost our voice’

    Whether Dennis Chavez would win his first bid for the U.S. Senate in 1934, would be determined in Las Vegas. Election results indicated he had lost to incumbent Republican Bronson Cutting by a mere 1,261 votes statewide, and Chavez contested the election only in San Miguel County.    

  • Work of Art: ‘Your slip is showing’

    For years, Readers Digest carried a feature called “Pardon, Your Slip is Showing,” highlighting journalistic “slips” that appeared in the American press.

    When Las Vegas attempted a commercial airline and offered rides to families at a penny a pound, there were quite a few takers. But as interest dropped off, apparently the airline sponsored a promotion, which provided breakfast before each flight.

  • Editor's Note: Doctors and lawyers

    It was 1992. Months earlier, my first daughter had been born, and life was good. I had a reporter’s job at a weekly newspaper and, after a scare in the first days of Amy’s life, we were raising a healthy baby.

    Looking back at that time, we had so much more than we realized.

    What we didn’t have, however, was money.

  • Dulcey Amargo: Life is good

    Recently I was listening to my wake-up call — KFUN — in the early morning, and Martha Johnsen was talking about some mishaps that had beset her.

    Innocuous, everyday things they were — a fly in her coffee cup, a lost earring, a flat tire. Yet, her positive outlook offset these mischances. Her stories about the drawbacks are always followed by explanations  of how the problems could have been worse. She ended her Jeremiad with “Life is good.”

    I’ll have to agree wholeheartedly with her.

  • Nuestra Historia - El Senador

    An icon in our state’s history, he remains among our foremost citizens. His bold achievements continue to affect the lives of every New Mexican, and his story is as relevant in Las Vegas as it is in Albuquerque’s south valley, or any other place in the Land of Enchantment.

    He was the great Dennis Chavez, whose life-size bronze represents New Mexico in Statuary Hall in our nation’s Capitol, where he stands alongside  George Washington, Daniel Webster and Dwight Eisenhower.

  • Forests to Faucets: A sense of urgency

    What used to be a green landscape to the north and west is now black with charred forests.

  • Work of Art: Ready for some tofurkey?

    Ah! We’re going to have some tofurkey in a few days. We’d better cleanse  our palates in preparation for gormandizing.

    Tofurkey? It sounds almost like an obscenity, and in a family newspaper! Tofurkey, as you may have conjectured, is a  vegetarian alternative to turkey.

    I got the word from the vocabulary website “Wordnik.” But that’s as close as I intend to get to it. Learning a new word is not the same as eating what it represents.

  • Publisher's Note: Mountainside experiences

    By the time you read this, I should be in Arkansas visiting my parents and preparing for a trip into the Ozark Mountains, where about 50 of us McDonalds (along with other last names, thanks to various family extensions) will rent and take over a lodge for a massive holiday celebration.

  • Nuestra Historia - Highlands’ Eyring left office in his chair

    We conclude our myth, legend or fact series with the bizarre departure of a Highlands University president 60 years ago.

    On Nov. 23, 1951, the Highlands University board of regents fired university president Edward Eyring, who had served in that position since 1939. Eyring had apparently served well for more than a decade, but in the last year had become erratic, according to the board.