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Columns

  • Another Perspective: That was back in oh-two

    At what point will the term “turn of the century” refer to this century instead of last? To me the expression corresponds to the era when my dad, born in 1903, came around.

    But we’ve been into the 21st century for 11 years, and technically, the few years past ought to be the real turn of the century.

    In addition, for years I’ve heard people say things like, “Back in oh-2, when I was a kid ...” It’s usually an exaggeration, one I used in class a number of times.

  • Publisher's Note: The magic of reading

    When I was a kid, I think I was dyslexic, only I didn’t know it. I don’t think anybody knew it. Years later, when I was in my 20s, my mother figured it out. She learned what dyslexia is, and remembered how I would read words backwards.

    I didn’t become much of a reader until I quit college at age 20.

  • A stunning parallel

    By Sara Welsch

    Well, we’ve come full circle. Five years ago, Bill Richardson’s administration was asked for state e-mails about an audit of the driver’s license program. It refused, claiming executive privilege, and the Republican Party of New Mexico filed suit.

  • Publisher's Note: A history of divisions

    If you haven’t figured it out by now, I have a passion for history. In fact, that’s part of the reason I was drawn to journalism. Newspapers, it’s been said, record “the first draft of history.”

    In 1879, the founder of this newspaper, Russell Kistler, did more than just write the “first draft.” He also made history. Unfortunately, part of his legacy can be found in the divisions that helped define Las Vegas.

  • Work of Art: This calls for collarboration

    As a continuing unrepentant language cop, I really had thought of laying off criticizing those electronic message boards that greet visitors.

    Yes, since it’s summer, when most of the schools are in recess, there hasn’t been much to report. But if there is a bit of criticism, I aim it at the fact that a number of the signs appear to have gone on summer break, along with teachers and students.

  • Publisher's Note: Letters and a columnist

    Sometimes the letters to the editor consume me. Sometimes there are just too many.

    And, sometimes, they are just too good.

    Our last couple days worth of Viewpoints pages are a good example of what I’m talking about. When I started building Friday’s editorial pages last Wednesday, I had a dozen letters in the system ready to run. I got six in on Friday, and three more in today.

  • Nuestra Historia - The railroad bypasses Las Vegas

    By 1871 there existed a transcontinental railroad across the United States, spanning the northern Great Plains, and soon plans were in place to run a rail line to the southwest, roughly along the route of the Santa Fe Trail.  
    Thus was commenced a new railway  from Topeka, Kansas, to Santa Fe. (As early as 1863 the Atchison & Topeka Railroad added Santa Fe to its company name,  when it decided that New Mexico’s capital city would be the southern destination of its rail line.)

  • Work of Art: An idiot’s guide to idioms

    One of the things some of us did on our own, without getting paid, was individual tutoring. During my term on the faculty at Highlands University, some dedicated students, usually Asians, wishing to “rap,” often visited me.

  • Publisher's Note: Another boomer failure?

    One of the greatest accomplishments of the baby boomers is not that we turned race and color into non-issues on the American landscape, but that we raised the generation that might just do it.

    Case in point: The election of Barack Obama, our first African-American president. He was elected with the overwhelming support of young voters — more so than he had with voters over age 50.

  • Dulcey Amargo: It’s not always easy

    Since March of this year, it has seemed a veritable slalom of zigzags placed in the path of Las Vegas City Schools as well as other school district employees.

    It was nice to see that Paul D. Henry Elementary was recognized for its success in student achievement in March. But before long, there was what educationalists designate as “disequilibration,” a term which generally denotes being out of balance.