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Columns

  • Forests to Faucets: A sense of urgency

    What used to be a green landscape to the north and west is now black with charred forests.

  • Work of Art: Ready for some tofurkey?

    Ah! We’re going to have some tofurkey in a few days. We’d better cleanse  our palates in preparation for gormandizing.

    Tofurkey? It sounds almost like an obscenity, and in a family newspaper! Tofurkey, as you may have conjectured, is a  vegetarian alternative to turkey.

    I got the word from the vocabulary website “Wordnik.” But that’s as close as I intend to get to it. Learning a new word is not the same as eating what it represents.

  • Publisher's Note: Mountainside experiences

    By the time you read this, I should be in Arkansas visiting my parents and preparing for a trip into the Ozark Mountains, where about 50 of us McDonalds (along with other last names, thanks to various family extensions) will rent and take over a lodge for a massive holiday celebration.

  • Nuestra Historia - Highlands’ Eyring left office in his chair

    We conclude our myth, legend or fact series with the bizarre departure of a Highlands University president 60 years ago.

    On Nov. 23, 1951, the Highlands University board of regents fired university president Edward Eyring, who had served in that position since 1939. Eyring had apparently served well for more than a decade, but in the last year had become erratic, according to the board.

  • Forests to Faucets: Connecting the dots after the wildfires

    Editor’s note: This is the first of two columns by Egan.

    From the Track, the Pacheco Canyon and the Las Conchas fires in the northern part of the state to the Miller, Quail Ridge, and Ruidoso Downs fires in the state’s southern tier, New Mexico is emerging from its most severe wildfire season ever. Given prevailing climate patterns, it is generally believed that a season like the one we just experienced will be more the norm than an exception.  

  • Work of Art: An internal optometrist

    Is there a chance Americans just don’t read as much as they used to? And if they do, have their reading habits and choice of material changed significantly? And can we count the texting-pecking exchanges on iPhone keyboards as reading?
    I ask this question earnestly. At the moment I don’t have access to data to verify or contradict what I believe. In this case, I’m just asking.

    A Highlands professor I really respect, back in the days when we used to eat dinosaurs, Elmer Schooley, made a believer of me.

  • Publisher's Note: The blame game

    “Some folks hate the whites who hate the blacks who hate the klan; most of us hate anything we don’t understand.”

    — from Kris Kristofferson’s 1972 song “Jesus Was A Capricorn”

    On the far right, the Tea Party has tapped a vein of discontentment by blaming the government for all our problems. And on the far left, the Occupy Wall Street forces have laid the blame at the feet of the big corporations and their greed.

  • Veteran's Perspective: Our real national debt

    Google the term “National Debt” and you will quickly receive the search results for millions of websites.

    Most deal with the very serious issues of government overspending and the accumulation of more than two centuries of federal deficits. Yet very few bring up the biggest national debt of them all — that which America owes to her veterans.

    Today, Veterans Day, marks the perfect opportunity for us to take an historical audit on just how much this nation owes her heroes.

  • Nuestra Historia - El Padre Polaco and his pipe

    We continue our fact-or-fiction series with the tale of the Polish priest who accidentally burned down our first church, when he fell asleep smoking his pipe — so it is said.

    He was Alexander Grzelachowski (gre-law-how-ski), the first parish priest at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church, who came to Las Vegas in 1851. Born in Poland when much of that country was part of Russia, he studied for the priesthood in France, and later immigrated to the United States.

  • Work of Art Little has changed

    Several years ago, in the pre-911 era, before we needed to open up our world to the TSA, in the name of Homeland Security, we almost missed our flight to Orlando, Fla.

    Back then, there were none of those interminable lines of people ordered to remove their shoes or subject themselves to touchy-feelie pinching, patting, probing, poking and prodding. So, though my crew arrived too late to check our bags — we needed to tote them all the way to our destination — we were allowed on the plane, even with our bazookas, pipe bombs and jumbo bottles of lotion.