• Dispatch New Mexico - Space exploration by way of NM

    Did you know that New Mexico has a “space trail”?

    It includes more than 50 specific locations around the state and spans the ages — from a mountaintop called Wizard’s Roost in Lincoln County, where prehistoric New Mexicans aligned stones to the summer and winter solstices, to the Socorro County’s Magdalena Ridge Observatory, one of many modern-day astronomical observatories around the state.

  • Work of Art: People say it’s only natural

    Why am I pacing like an expectant father? Why do I wake up suddenly at night, look around to assure myself that our two “daughters” are safely ensconced in their beds?

    Let me explain, and there’s much to explain:

    By now, several of you may have read my Facebook post that explains my family’s hosting of two exchange students for the school year. They’re part of the AFS Intercultural Program that places students from other countries with American households.

  • Ranch stories from the past

    Summertime brings out the “do you remember when?” stories from long ago here at the ranch. Last week one of our many kids who worked here during one of our busy guest ranch times came back to check out her old haunts, her old summer away from high school, then college a long time ago. There are many stories still floating around about those times here, and here is yet another one.

  • New HU president reaches out to the Las Vegas community

    By Sam Minner

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Roswell and its crime wave

    ROSWELL — There’s a big story here, with tragic and unfortunate legs. It’s the rash of high-profile homicides that’s gripping this city of 50,000 people.

    The latest victims, as of this writing, are three people who may have been gunned down while sleeping. Since I came to the Daily Record last May, we’ve had a shootout in a Taco Bell parking lot (which left one man dead and an officer injured), among other shootings. The Wild West is running rampant in Roswell these days.

  • Work of Art: Tío Juan rescued us

    When people my age were in school, the word processor consisted of 1) a pencil and 2) a piece of paper. Just like today’s computers and calculators, our tools of the ‘50s also had an “enter” and a “delete” function. They’re called lead and erasers.

    When my sister, Bingy, and I were at Immaculate Conception School, we often shared a teacher, Sister Mary Matematica Primera, who dreamed nightly about the amount of arithmetic homework she was about to pile on.

  • Just a Thought - What to do when you hit a milestone

    By Rick Kraft

    Today I hit a milestone. I have a file folder on my computer that inside it has numbers assigned to each column that I have submitted for publication. Starting with number one, a May 2001 column titled “Choices We Make,” the columns are numbered consecutively all the way up to 799.

    Today I submit column number 800. It is a milestone for the “Just a Thought” column that has taken over 15 years to reach.

    So what do you do when you reach a milestone in your life? You celebrate and then move on. Let me explain.

  • Another perspective - Home-safe-home

    By Tony Hernandez and Terry Brunner

    Some say the electric feeling of buying and moving into your own home never wears off. When you own the floors you’re standing on, the walls surrounding you and the roof over your head, you also own great satisfaction from the hard work that resulted in your home becoming yours.

    Yet, just as it was hard work to achieve the American Dream of homeowner-ship, being responsible for maintaining and, inevitably, repairing your own home can be just as much hard work.

  • Editorial Roundup - August 28, 2015

    Compiled by The Associated Press
    The Vallejo Times-Herald on transparency in police shooting cases (Aug. 19):
    In the wake of Ferguson, California this month became the first state in the nation to outright ban the use of secret grand juries to investigate police killings of civilians.

  • Another perspective - Remember the Animas

    By Diana Presser

    Remember when the American government assured us that covering our heads with our math books, while crouched under our desks, would protect us in the event of a nuclear bomb? We were elementary students in a time when we trusted adults to know what was best for us – especially our country’s leaders.