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Columns

  • Work of Art: Voy a typiar mi column

    When two languages bump into each other, they borrow stuff.

    English: “Hey, Español! I need a word for these flying pests. Can I borrow ‘mosquito’?”

    Español: “No problemo. While we are on the topic, I could use ‘boycott’ (though I might spell it ‘boicot’).”

    Ahora voy a typiar mi column. Come on now! You had no trouble getting el gisto of that sentence. And in the near future, you’re likely to be seeing much more of this kind of linguistic mélange.

  • Beth Speaks for Herself -

    Last November, I attended Associate Professor Craig Conley’s lecture at Highlands. He spoke as part of the Hermit’s Peak Watershed Alliance Land Stewardship Series. I was mesmerized by his passion and enthusiasm.

    His topic? Dirt and what it has to do with climate change. Actually we talked about soil, which is the proper way to refer to what covers our earth and isn’t water. Now I am a water nymph, well, maybe not a nymph anymore but certainly a fan.

  • Another Perspective: Four things parents can do to prepare kids for financial success
  • Just a Thought: The fine art of eating an elephant

    You find yourself eyeball to eyeball looking up at an elephant. He is on the path right in front of you, directly between you and where you want to be. What do you do?

    What is in your world that appears to be too big for you to conquer? What is it that overwhelms you? What is ahead of you in the path of life that has got you worried and questioning that you might not be able to get past it?

  • Palabras Pinturescas:Proud Watrous used to have three bars, was popular stop

    It is fun to hear from my readers, and I’m often asked interesting questions about our northern New Mexico history.

    Such was the case last week when a reader who read Marc Simmons’ Trail Dust column in the Santa Fe New Mexican recently.

  • Dispatch New Mexico- Advice for the newly elected

    Last month, after municipal elections were held around the state, a bunch of fresh faces took their oaths of office and became city and town councilors, trustees and mayors for their first time. To help prepare them for their job, the New Mexico Municipal League, in its March newsletter, set out to educate them.

  • Work of Art: Fear of falling

    When my siblings and I were younger, the summer highlight was a “picinic” (Mom always added a syllable to that word, assuming that somehow the extra vowel would pique our pleasure) around Mora, Holman Hill or Tres Ritos, where we children waded and climbed.

    Close to where Mom spread out her picinic blanket, my brother Severino, sister Evangeline and I got our fill of thrills as we tested our climbing skills in the hills.

  • Just a Thought: Learning to KISS (keep it simple, stupid)

    We have a tendency to make life more complex than it really is. So let’s try to simplify it today. Let’s break it down to its simplest level.

    Life is a series of interactions with others. Not interacting with others is not an option that is available. Because of this we must leave the comfort and security of our homes and go out and engage in interactions with others.

    Some do this well without missing a beat, but for others their stress meter tops out as they are pushed to the edge of (or even outside) their comfort zone.

  • Palabras Pinturescas: Sewing up victims of DWI wrecks was routine for doctor

    There are many benefits to living in Northern New Mexico. A big one in my book is being able to meet, to visit with our local public servants on a one-to-one encounter. I know that this is hard to come by in our larger cities and sometimes the message at hand gets garbled by speakers who are at the lower rungs of the topic ladder.

  • Dispatch New Mexico- Border concerns cause stir

    There aren’t a lot of people living in the southwestern corner of the state that borders Arizona and Mexico, known as New Mexico’s Bootheel. But that didn’t stop hundreds of area residents from finding their way to Animas earlier this month for a meeting about border security.

    Area newspapers reported that more than 600 people turned out for the meeting. And they sent this “resounding message,” according to the Hidalgo County Herald: “The border is not safe, despite what you may have heard otherwise.”