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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - New Mexico becomes a territory

    After 1846, New Mexico was under absolute U.S. military rule for almost five years. A limited civil government was appointed by whatever U.S. Army commander was in charge, following the departure of Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny. (After his invasion in Aug. 1846, Kearny stayed in New Mexico only 40 days, continuing his march west to occupy California, where he declared himself military governor in March 1847.)

  • Work of Art - When status mattered

    Remember when status in school meant something? Remember when the more popular kids thought of themselves as royalty?

    As a senior today, four times older than when I was the other kind of senior, I look back and wonder why popularity, or lack thereof, mattered.

    Let me explain:

  • Editor's Note - A love story

    Heather Glidewell McDonald’s life is a love story. One big part of her story is that she fell for her Rogers, Ark., high school sweetheart, Don McDonald. They separated to attend different colleges, but that didn’t last long and, in 1975, they graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, together — a year after they got married. They remained husband and wife for 37-1/2 years.

    From the beginning, Heather was surrounded by the love of family.

  • Nuestra Historia - After saying no to slavery, N.M. denied statehood

    Not to know what happened before you were born is to be forever a child. This ancient axiom is especially true about momentous historical events which shaped our destiny.

    As this Centennial series continues, we hope to relate the critical moments which unfolded as New Mexico emerged from a centuries-old outpost of the Spanish empire, to become the 47th American state.

  • Work of Art - What grade did you get?

    At least we passed out a syllabus. Yes, the course outline  that we gave out on the first day of class explained what a student needed to do to pass the class.

    So, the students at least had some direction: In order to earn a certain grade in this class, thou shalt accomplish certain things. But that’s only part of the issue, as some believed that simply by performing various tasks they were guaranteed an “A.” The other part of the equation was how well they did the work.

  • Editor's Note - The race for mayor

    Without polling the candidates, which I don’t have time to do this week, it’s hard to say what motivated so many Las Vegas citizens to run for so few positions. Seventeen people filed for mayor and two council seats, including an impressive nine for the city’s top job.

    Maybe so many jumped in because the city is at a pivotal moment in time, when we could move forward on things such as water projects, or backward on things like political favoritism.

  • Nuestra Historia

    By Jesus Lopez

  • Work of Art - One is swell, other is lousy

    Several years ago, I made a trade: a bicycle I hardly used for a dachshund. Heidi (what else does one name a weenie dog?) had acquired bad manners, gulping her food, piddling on the carpet when chided and scratching and chewing on wooden items.

  • Editor's Note: Conspiracy theories

    If there’s one thing that has gained traction in the Internet age, it’s conspiracy theories. They’re everywhere.

  • Another Perspective: Centennial letters

    On the morning of Jan. 6, the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors will host a first-day-of-issue event on behalf of the U.S. Postal Service and its New Mexico Centennial stamp. That we’re kicking off a year of Centennial activities at the History Museum with a stamp-related event delights my historian sensibilities by inviting New Mexico’s citizens to take part in a letter-writing project.