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Columns

  • Work of Art - Caucasian and light-skinned

    The rage is palpable. Remember the casting call from an out-of-state agency that sought only “Caucasians or light-skinned Hispanics”? Anger has gone viral.

    To review: On Location Casting posted on its website a solicitation for “real families.” The website listed desirable qualities among the applicants, but the light-skinned requirement set people off.
    What were the talent scouts thinking?

  • Editor's Note - The root of all ...

    Money. It’s been on my mind a lot lately, because I don’t have enough of it.

    Oh, I know, you think I shouldn’t complain because I’m paid the big bucks to run the Optic. And, yes, I know I should be thankful for my seven-figure salary — I just wish those seven digits didn’t include the two to the right of the decimal point.

    Still, unlike a lot of people, I’m fortunate to have all the necessities of life.

  • Nuestra Historia - Founders met to draft state’s constitution

    It had been 60 long years since New Mexico became an American territory, following four years of U.S. military occupation after Kearny’s invasion in 1846. On June 20, 1910, at 1:40 p.m., with the stroke of his pen, President Taft enabled New Mexico to become the 47th American state.

  • Work of Art — Battling the elements

    Edward Flores, limping, fearing frostbite and distraught over marital problems and separation from his sons, is also without a car.

    It’s a strange tale, as circuitous as the routes he followed to get to Las Vegas, all of it occurring within the past two weeks. Part of the odyssey consumed much of last Saturday, through the winding, twisting cow-paths of eastern San Miguel and northern Guadalupe counties, as he and volunteers went in search of his car.

  • Editor's Note - Musical inheritance

    “There is geometry in the humming of the strings. There is music in the spacing of the spheres.”
    — Pythagoras, 5th century B.C.

    Several years ago, I made it my mission to give my daughters an appreciation for the music of my generation. After all, that’s something we did right.

  • Nuestra Historia - Three who made statehood happen

    At the critical moment in time when statehood was finally within reach, three men in particular made it happen. While one is always associated with the event, the other two have long been forgotten and are seldom mentioned by contemporary writers and historians.

  • Community Water Report - Protecting our water future - Part 2

    Again, water supply is certainly the primary obstacle to Las Vegas’ economic health and growth.

    The Las Vegas Community Water Board has been closely tracking the city’s water operations. In light of the political rhetoric over the past several weeks, we thought it worthwhile to report the facts about the city’s water behavior, as we see them.

  • Work of Art - What’s to fear in Vegas?

    During a recent get-together with our three sons — one brought his family all the way from Denmark, one brought his spouse from Albuquerque, and the third son brought his wife and kids all the way from next door — our conversation turned to what life was like in our youth.

    You first, Dad.

    Well, I’ve already written a million words about how it seemed that there was a tough guy on every corner, who set the stopwatch he didn’t own, waiting to pounce on a peace-loving kid from the Railroad Avenue barrio.

  • Editor's Note: Post- and pre-election analysis

    It wasn’t a very rowdy election cycle. There were numerous occasions in which the municipal candidates, 16 of them in all, had a chance to go toe-to-toe on the issues, but aside from a few criticisms thrown at Mayor Alfonso Ortiz, and one documented attack on councilor Tonita Gurule-Giron, I’d have to say it was all fairly mild.

    The runoff races, however, may stir up a lot more passion. There are big differences between the remaining candidates.

    First, take a look at Joey Herrera and Joe McCaffrey for Ward 3 council seat.

  • Nuestra Historia - New Mexico by any other name — Arizona?

    By Jesus Lopez

    Even New Mexico’s name was offensive to Washington, and during the long quest for statehood, several attempts were made to change her age-old identity.

    As early as 1869, a Congressional bill proposing statehood required that New Mexico’s name be changed to Lincoln. In 1888, New Mexico’s admission was proposed in Congress under the name Montezuma. Even these attempts at statehood having failed, a name change was never actually required —  until 1906.