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Columns

  • Work of Art - No instant replay in 1912

    Super Slo-Mo (that’s a term I believe I’ve just made up), instant replay, zoom lenses, extra-sensitive mikes: they’ve spoiled it for all of us.

    Let me explain:

    It was exactly this time 100 years ago that Las Vegas became transformed from a sleepy little town to an active little town, with the hosting of a world heavyweight championship bout.

    Those of you who read our Page 1 Looking Back feature may be aware that the Fourth of July festivities that year included a fight between Jack Johnson and Jim Flynn.

  • Editor's Note - Festivals here and abroad

    In honor of the fiestas that grace our landscape, last year at about this time I wrote a column about some of the festivals I’ve experienced up close and personally.

    There’s Toad Suck Daze in my old hometown of Conway, Ark. It’s named after an area along the banks of the Arkansas River where, legend has it, people used to go to suck on bottles of booze “until they swelled up like toads,” giving Conway a novel name for its festival that, actually, has nothing to do with Toad Suck but has drawn national attention anyway.

  • Dulcey Amargo - Let the games begin

    We’ve got so many phrases that refer to games and our human penchant for competition, but the Greeks, in the sixth century, started something that has become much bigger than they ever imagined.

    I’m referring to our modern-day phenomenon, online games.  Curious, I did an online search of the term, which revealed that more than 500,000 apps are available for online gamers. These games are a far cry from the boxing, running, wrestling, equestrian, etc., games that the Greeks offered in their heyday.

  • Nuestra Historia - ‘Who is on trial?’

    District Attorney Luis Armijo’s role quickly receded at Carl Magee’s trial in June 1923, and the young Armijo limited his participation to jury selection.
    Once a jury was seated, the special prosecutors took over, with former attorney general O.O. Askren taking the lead.

  • Work of Art - Why we must share

    For weeks I’ve searched for a concise way of articulating my feelings on how the electronic era  has changed our lives. Then it hit me.

    In Sunday’s Parade Magazine, there’s a cartoon that shows a man at the computer, asking his wife, “What’s the point of having an opinion if you don’t email it to everyone you know?”

    Now that was perfect: We must share, but if there’s no one to receive the message, what’s the point?

  • Editor's Note - Newspaper war stories

    I think it was one of the greatest newspaper wars of our time — the battle between two Little Rock, Ark., newspapers, the Arkansas Gazette and the Arkansas Democrat.

    I’m not sure the story I’m about to tell supports that contention, but I’ll tell it anyway. Just for the fun of it.

    It was my first journalist job off campus. I was hired at the Gazette to take down scores and stats and write brief high school football game summaries.

  • Nuestra Historia - Armed deputies guard Carl Magee trial

    As Carl Magee went on trial in June of 1923, Sheriff Lorenzo Delgado posted armed deputies in Judge Leahy’s courtroom — and their presence was unmistakable and intimidating. As later remembered by an Optic reporter who covered the trial, “heavily armed deputies constantly walked back and forth across the well of the court between the jury room and Judge Leahy’s chambers.”

  • Work of Art - Nothing to do here?

    It really seemed easy. I watched as three grandchildren tried the ridiculously easy task of kicking a sponge ball through a space of about two feet square. What’s the big deal?

    Carly, Celina and Arthur Roland, my grandchildren,  couldn’t knock the ball through; in fact, most of the time they missed the ball completely. The catch? Jennifer Ballen, of the San Miguel County DWI task force, had them wear goggles that simulate how an intoxicated person would see things.

  • Editor's Note - The rises and falls of the Vigils

    Last week I offered up some post-election tidbits based on the results of the June 5 primary elections, but I saved this one for a column of its own. Put into context, it’s much bigger than a tidbit.

    Two primary elections resulted in the defeat of two Vigils from the Valley. Richard Vigil, a state representative since 1999, was beaten by Tomás Salazar, who received 56 percent of the vote. Rep. Vigil will serve out his term and Salazar is poised to take his place in January 2013.

  • Nuestra Historia - ‘Abandon hope all ye who enter here’

    On June 11, 1923, Judge David J. Leahy issued an arrest warrant for Carl Magee, ordering Sheriff Lorenzo Delgado to “take the body of Carl C. Magee and keep him safely so that you have his body forthwith before the District Court within and for San Miguel County.”

    Secundino Romero had set in motion the wheels of San Miguel County justice — his justice. Carl Magee’s Albuquerque newspaper would be silenced, and Magee himself punished. The stage was set in a town controlled by a family whose very name meant Las Vegas and San Miguel County.