.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - Texas invasion foiled, Gov. Armijo rallied in LV

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    For the Optic

    What has become an obscure footnote in both our local and New Mexico history, is the futile Texas invasion of San Miguel county in 1841, or what most historians have downplayed as the Texas-Santa Fe Expedition. It occurred here five years before General Kearny, leading the Army of the West, proclaimed in Las Vegas on Aug. 15 1846, the occupation and annexation of New Mexico by the United States.     

    These are the facts:

  • Editorial Roundup - May 2, 2014

    The Associated Press
    The Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer on a smaller Army (April 26):
    It wasn’t long ago that the Army was 570,000 soldiers deep. With two wars underway and other commitments around the world, that’s what it took.
    Now, with Iraq behind us and Afghanistan winding down, Washington budget-writers are calling for big military staffing cuts. The Army is already down to about 522,000 solders. The projection is 490,000 by late next year and 450,000 two years later.

  • Work of Art: Let’s not dumb it down

    Without hesitation, I declare that no person had a bigger positive influence on the English language than William Shakespeare, whose birthday was believed to have been April 23, coincidentally, also the date of his death.

    But this isn’t going to be a pep talk on Shakespeare; rather, it’s a lament.

    Let me explain:

    Daniel Burnett, secretary of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, a nonprofit dedicated to academic excellence, recently wrote that Shakespeare studies are virtually non-existent today.

  • Another Perspective: New Mexico needs new ideas for job growth

    By Fred Nathan/Think New Mexico

    Prompted by a large decline in federal spending, New Mexicans are now engaged in a healthy and useful dialogue about how best to diversify our economy.

    Think New Mexico would like to offer two ideas that we believe could propel private sector job growth in our state – and that gubernatorial and legislative candidates from both parties should be able to embrace.         

  • Editorial Roundup - April 25, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    Houston Chronicle on the demographic changes occurring in Texas and the importance of improving education conditions for black and brown kids (April 18):
    Texas is changing: Improving education conditions for black and brown kids is key to a bright future

  • Work of Art: Was it payback time?

    On the wall of the office of long-time Highlands University department secretary Jean Greer was a framed photo that showed a lone goat atop a craggy mountain. The message beneath it was, “I’m so far behind, it looks like I’m w-a-y ahead.”

    That was years ago, when I worked there. I’m reminded of Amtrak and its penchant for tardiness. Why doesn’t the government-subsidized railway company simply adopt this slogan: “We’re always prompt, no matter how long it takes”?

  • Just a Thought - He is risen, He is not here

    By Rick Kraft

    He is alive! He is alive! He is alive! The first Easter morning must have been an exciting experience for those who had walked the journey with Jesus.

  • Nuestra Historia - Las Vegas is born

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    For the Optic

    Even before 1835, farmers and ranchers from San Miguel had raised crops and grazed livestock on the lush meadows along the Rio Gallinas. And as related in our last column, Luis María Cabeza de Baca and his family had settled las vegas as early as 1820.

  • Work of Art: Lack toast . . . and tolerant

    On a trip last weekend to Missouri, my wife and I were among the last breakfast eaters on the Amtrak unit, their probably having run out of items on the menu. I chose toast with my omelet but received a (not-too-shabby) croissant instead.

  • Dulcey Amargo - Service with a smile

    It goes without saying that a good meal, served graciously, is worthy of a fair tip for the server, right?

    I, personally, keep that in mind each time I eat at a sit-down establishment.  There’s history behind my premise, as, in my high school years, I was a waitress at a number of eateries in my home town. Now, keep in mind, at that time, minimum wage was about 75 cents an hour. That meant that an eight-hour stint would garner one about $6.