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Columns

  • Editor's Note - No better man

    Real men. I’ve known a few. Old-school men who faced down fears and conquered their world. Strong men who took on great challenges.

    Fighters, lovers, warriors, leaders, competitors, champions — even losers who never quit even when they knew they’d been beaten. These were men who stood their ground.

    But none of them had more of an impact on my life than my father. To me, he was always a giant among men.

  • Nuestra Historia - New Town glittered with Tamme Opera House

    Emerging as a separate and independent municipality following the failed attempt at unification with the west side in 1882-84, East Las Vegas quickly took root as a dynamic American city. Major water works, and gas and electric projects soon got under way in New Town, and Protestant churches were erected at Zion Hill and on Douglas Avenue. (See “Zion Hill and the Early Protestant Churches,” Nuestra Historia, Jan. 6, 2012.)

  • Editor's Note - Working off script

    It’s no wonder the television networks opted to cut back their coverage of the party conventions. These days they’re so scripted that one might mistake them for infomercials.

    Still, there are those occasional unscripted moments, like the Clint Eastwood episode at the Republican National Convention. Bizarre is a good word to describe it, and sadly entertaining. I doubt it did the Romney-Ryan ticket much good.

  • Nuestra Historia - Failed unity: 1882-1884

    Soon after the east side began its lightning-fast growth in 1879, many west side businesses moved across the river to the new rail town, finding it easier and more profitable to be near the railroad docks and sprawling commercial houses on Railroad Avenue. Thus began a gradual decline of the west side, which will be reviewed at length later.

  • Work of Art - Fleeing a flea market

    “Did you catch that typo?” I asked my oldest son, Stan Adam, as we drove past a place of active outdoor sales.

    He said he hadn’t, so I made a U-turn to give him another look. “I don’t see anything unusual —  for Las Vegas,” he said, “unless you’re looking at the way the people misspelled “flea.”

  • Editor's Note - Thoughts on working

    Editor’s note: This column first appeared on Labor Day 2011.

    If you are a working stiff, sweating away eight or more hours a day for someone who’s making the “big bucks,” there’s a good chance that you feel unappreciated.
    Or, if you’re a boss, stressing out over all the problems that confront you, you probably know that, from time to time, it really is “lonely at the top.”

  • Nuestra Historia - ‘Going from one country into another’

    East and West Las Vegas evolved as if they were two neighboring countries, divided by a river, with a border crossing on Bridge Street.

    The remarkable separateness of the two towns was vividly observed by Milton Nahm, as he recalled covering the Carl Magee trials as a cub reporter for the Optic in 1923 and 1926.

    Nahm’s description of the pronounced divide is intensely poignant, and his narrative transports you to that time:

  • Another Perspective - Negotiation, litigation, and never an agreement

    Last week we went into detail about how the City of Las Vegas and the acequias moved from litigation to negotiation and, unfortunately, back into litigation over Gallinas River water rights. Now let’s explore where the impasse currently stands — and how litigation is again getting in the way.

    When the court-ordered legal proceedings to resume litigation, the acequias sought to continue negotiations and, at first, the city seemed to agree. Not so now.

  • Work of Art - ‘Officer, it’s water, not beer’

    The commotion lasted half a Saturday morning, taking place almost directly in front of my house on Railroad Avenue, otherwise known as El Barrio.

    It was back in the ‘50s, on a summer morning when several of us spotted a shirtless neighbor, Tommy, driving while guzzling a can of Coors.

  • Editor's Note - Listing our water needs

    Two weeks ago in this space, I told you about a couple of watershed tours I took with several others. The New Mexico Forest and Watershed Restoration Institute organized a tour of the Gallinas Canyon watershed, where Las Vegas gets nearly all its water, and a second-day excursion to Raton, where we toured that city’s watershed, which burned a year ago.