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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - La Voz and the three amigos

    When Felix Martinez acquired La Voz del Pueblo and moved it from Santa Fe to Las Vegas in 1890, he also brought with him its Santa Fe editor and former owner, Enrique H. Salazar, who helped Martinez get the newspaper off the ground in Las Vegas.

    Salazar also penned many of the fiery editorials which first appeared here in La Voz, but he and Martinez soon parted ways, and Salazar would establish another Las Vegas newspaper, El Independiente, which later fell into the hands of political boss Secundino Romero, as will be related in a subsequent column.

  • Work of Art - Double axels, double features

    Two things that generate a lot of nostalgia have been in the news lately: The prospect of bringing back the skating pond at Montezuma and the possibility of Las Vegas’ soon being without a drive-in theater.
    First the skating pond. It’s hard to pinpoint the year people stopped using the rink, located next to a steep cliff just beyond the community of Montezuma.

  • Editor's Note - Save the drive-in

    Seems that for the past few years there’s been concern about how much longer the Fort Union Drive-In Theater will be able to remain open. And yet, year in and year out, owner Jeanna DiLucchio manages to produce another season of good movies starting on or near the Memorial Day weekend.

    Each year, however, it gets more and more challenging, because the movie industry is moving away from the 35 mm celluloid films that Fort Union depends on. In fact, according to DiLucchio, the industry has set 2013 as a cutoff year for such films. Instead, they’re going digital.

  • Nuestra Historia - La Voz del Pueblo and Félix Martinez

    At least in the case of Félix Martinez, there may be an answer to the age-old question whether the times make the man, or whether it is the man who makes the times. Martinez made a lasting and positive impact on the future of Las Vegas and New Mexico, and was a remarkable man — one of those Renaissance men whose legacies are immeasurable and enduring.

  • Another Perspective - Halting gun violence

    Our right to bear arms must be respected and honored, but responsible gun owners must recognize that principled compromises are necessary to ensure the public’s and our personal safety, and to preserve our treasured right to own firearms.

  • Work of Art - Picking Sunday’s winner

    How much do you think Sunday’s Super Bowl commercials on TV will cost? The latest figures show close to $4 million for a 30-second spot and about $8 million for a full minute.

    That comes out to about $126,666 a second. That’s Donald Trump-like money. By contrast — and inflation is a big factor here — a 30-second commercial cost $42,000 back in the late 1960s, when the Green Bay Packers beat the Kansas City Chiefs.

  • Editor's Note - Coming down the Gallinas

    If you’ve never attended one of the quarterly Gallinas Partnership meetings at Highlands University, I encourage you to do so. I attended my first one a couple of Fridays back — admittedly because I was on the agenda — and found it interesting and educational.

    About 50 people showed up for this particular meeting, which included four sets of speakers beginning with wildlife officials Rob Larrañaga and Debbie Pike talking about the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge east of town and the relatively new Rio Mora refuge in Mora County.

  • Nuestra Historia - The Gazette and other early newspapers

    We now continue our series about Las Vegas newspapers, as our tale of two cities would be lacking without the history of the fourth estate along the Gallinas.

    Newspapers often provide a candid glimpse into the social, cultural and political events of the past — and often influence them — and newspapers also write the first draft of history, as Optic publisher Tom McDonald has observed.

  • Work of Art - Might-have, could-have factor

    Que dira la gente? What will people say? I believe my late mother, Marie, went to bed each night with that question in mind, ready to use on any or all us five Trujillo children, some six decades ago.

    But to try to penetrate Mom’s thought processes necessitates a bit of background, Pay-It-Forward style. Remember the recent movie in which good deeds were paid before they became due? People were encouraged to engage in some act of kindness in the hopes it would soon bear fruit and benefit others.

  • Editor's Note - Sanity still rules

    Lately it seems that reason has taken a back seat to the crazies out there. But, fortunately, that’s not true.