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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - Gov. Ezequiel C de Baca’s last days

    It was a Sunday morning on Feb. 18, 1917. Surrounded by his family, Ezequiel C de Baca died peacefully at age 52, after 49 valiant days as New Mexico’s second governor.

    C de Baca had not sought the Democratic nomination for governor in 1916.

    He genuinely resisted attempts to draft him, protesting that he did not have the funds to wage a campaign. As well, he was feeling in persistent poor health, due to some unexplained ailment.

  • Work of Art - Election reaches new heights

    An article in the New Yorker once told of competition among purveyors of steaks along the tollways.

    My first experience with tollways — long before the Interstate network developed — was getting on the Turner Turnpike in Oklahoma, which in those days, the ‘60s, was the only way to drive across the state in less than a week.

  • Editor's Note - School daze in May

    May is always a crazy month. The end of a school year can come at a dizzying speed for a lot of people.

    Now comes a big question about how best to shape the 2012-13 school year in the Las Vegas City Schools district.

    Of course I’m talking about East Superintendent Sheryl McNellis-Martinez’s proposal to move the district from a five-day-a-week classroom schedule to four days, with Fridays set aside for teachers to improve their skills and some miscellaneous student activities, including tutoring and various extracurricular activities.

  • Nuestra Historia - Ezequiel C de Baca fought to protect land grant

    After Felix Martinez left Las Vegas in 1900, La Voz del Pueblo continued under Ezequiel C de Baca and Antonio Lucero. The weekly newspaper had a circulation of about 3,000 throughout New Mexico, and was the Territory’s leading Spanish language periodical.

    C de Baca and Lucero continued their Hispanic-oriented populist advocacy on the pages of La Voz, and between 1900 and 1912, the weekly became the alternative (Democratic) newspaper, fiercely critical of the established Republican order of the time.

  • Another Perspective - Mora’s solid waste issues

    As a low-income community, Mora County has faced great challenges in addressing basic services with regard to solid waste management.  

    The Mora County Collection Center (Mora County Transfer Station) is a project that is a small portion to the larger issue of solid waste management in Mora County.  Historically, solid waste disposal has been challenging, difficult, and was in great need of improvement.   

  • Work of Art - The word was ‘tie-teh’

    The rate of exchange didn’t fluctuate much for people like your resident doorman who doubles as a columnist.

    The few quarters I carry in my pocket remain there, even after an exchange of pleasantries and cash as my entry fee to local businesses.    

    We’re referring to two things here: My habit of asking for a quarter tip when I hold the door open for someone; and the ceaseless greetings by some mendicants who ask for “spare change” of customers when they enter — and leave — restaurants.

  • Editor's Note - A ‘Hunger Games’ challenge

    If you’ve read “The Hunger Games” — a three-book series written by Suzanne Collins— I dare you to find its deeper meanings.

    If you don’t, or can’t, I think you’re missing something. And if you don’t believe there’s any deeper meaning worth finding, that it’s just written as entertainment, I must wonder if you are being shallow in your literary consumption.

  • Work of Art - ‘Twenty-five cents, please’

    Sometimes I meet the most interesting people. I did Sunday at Souper Salad in Santa Fe. Let me explain.

    One can usually identify me as the man who, when holding open a door for someone at a restaurant, will ask for a tip.

    True, the denotation of “Twenty-five cents, please” means, of course, “Hand over the cash.” The connotation — and to me that’s what communication is mostly about — is “I’m just joking, trying to be friendly."

  • Editor's Note - A psychological impact

    In the afterglow of a successful President’s Gala at Highlands University, I can’t help but wonder what will come of it.

    The most obvious results are that more than $100,000 was raised to help Highlands students pay for their educations, and support for President Jim Fries was celebrated, and solidified, as never before.

    But I think the gala’s success was more than that.

    For Highlands and Las Vegas alike, I think the gala was a psychological boost, in a manner that’s unprecedented at least in recent years.

  • Nuestra Historia - Gov. Ezequiel C de Baca of Las Vegas

    Our Centennial series would be incomplete if we did not recount the life of Ezequiel C de Baca, New Mexico’s second governor and first lieutenant governor — and one of the great sons of Las Vegas.

    In 1916, from his modest home in Old Town, C de Baca waged his successful campaign to become New Mexico’s second governor. Tragically, he would die on the 49th day of his governorship — administering the affairs of state from his hospital bed in Santa Fe.