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Columns

  • Our watershed: The opportunities

    Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series running over several consecutive Fridays. It is written by members of the Hermit’s Peak Watershed Alliance, which seeks to foster land stewardship in the Gallinas, Sapello and Tecolote watersheds.

    To have adequate water supply, Las Vegas needs well designed, built and maintained water treatment, storage and delivery infrastructure. The first piece of this system is a healthy watershed to gather, clean and supply this water.

  • Work of Art - We lose them by threes

    It was impressive watching a procession of friends making their way up to the podium Monday to pay tribute to the friend of many: Mel Root.

  • Another Perspective - We can do better for our pets

    By Martina Holguin

    For the Optic

    Have you ever driven down a street and noticed a dog or two running alongside the road? When you head out to lunch does the family of cats living behind the dumpster catch your eye? When you take your own dog out for that last walk before bedtime, do your thoughts drift to all those cats and dogs who know the pangs of hunger and who sleep with one ear up, if they are lucky enough to find somewhere to sleep at all? These are the kinds of problems the Animal Welfare Coalition addresses every day.

  • Another Perspective - Reforms will help us compete

    At the beginning of the session, I called on the Legislature to pass reforms making New Mexico more competitive with neighboring states. The mandatory cuts in Washington, D.C. will disproportionately hurt our state, and while we will always fight to protect our labs and bases, we must simultaneously work to diversify our economy by building a stronger private sector.

    I’m pleased that by passing the New Mexico Jobs Package, we reached a bipartisan compromise that will help our economy grow by leveling the playing field with surrounding states.

  • Nuestra Historia - Why Highlands sits east of the Gallinas

    Many months ago, when we began our present tale of two cities, a variation of today’s article appeared in Nuestra Historia, to illustrate the great divide that existed early-on between East and West Las Vegas. As we conclude the story of the founding of Highlands University ­— to bring full circle the early struggle for the school — we present the column again, especially for those readers who have followed the story with interest, but may have missed the previous narrative.

  • Our Watershed - Its condition and threats

    Editor’s note: This is the fifth in a series running over several consecutive Fridays. It is written by members of the Hermit’s Peak Watershed Alliance, which seeks to foster land stewardship in the Gallinas, Sapello and Tecolote watersheds.

    When compared with heavily populated and largely urban or industrial watersheds, the Gallinas Watershed is in relatively good shape. But, if we expect it to continue supplying our water in to the future, we have to face some realities and maximize its performance and resilience to future threats.

  • Work of Art - Whom are youm to ask?

    The simple answer is that if you can use “him,” you can use “whom”’ if “he” fits, use “who.” That was my proposed subject for this week’s column.

    We were in the Optic newsroom as I spouted this bit of faux erudition, when fellow writer Lupita Gonzales said that when it comes to “whom,” we need to think of objects, not subjects. As a now-retired long-time teacher of languages, she’s right.

  • Another Perspective - Protecting our water

    By Bob Wessely

    For the Optic

    San Miguel County is acutely aware that the water supply upon which its citizens depend is severely limited.

    Variable surface streams, originating from snowmelt, springs, and rainwater runoff, have been used for agricultural and domestic purposes for centuries.

    Multiple formation layers of fresh groundwater have been deposited over the millennia, water that is pumped for domestic and agricultural uses. These layers or aquifers are very slowly refreshed by rainwater seepage.

  • Nuestra Historia - The two-hour break that saved Highlands

    On Monday, Feb. 6, 1893, Highlands University was born, only because John DeWitt Veeder and Felix Martinez were able to outmaneuver those who would have established only one normal school for the Territory, in Silver City, or none at all. It was a momentous day for Las Vegas, which would be forever transformed as the home of one of New Mexico’s early institutions of higher education.

  • Our Watershed - Mother Nature’s water system

    Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series running over several consecutive Fridays. It is written by members of the Hermit’s Peak Watershed Alliance, which seeks to foster land stewardship in the Gallinas, Sapello and Tecolote watersheds.

    The city of Las Vegas and its residents depend on water in the Gallinas River for more than 90 percent of its municipal needs. Storrie Lake Water Users Association receives almost all its water from the Gallinas River. That’s a serious dependency.