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Columns

  • Work of Art - Including the kitchen sink ...

    A comic strip I remember from my childhood showed Dagwood helping Blondie with the Thanksgiving dishes. He broke one, causing Blondie to say, “If you break one more plate, I won’t let you help me with the dishes any more.” And a light bulb went on in Dagwood’s speech balloon.

    Would a Spanish version of the same comic strip have used a slightly different word with a slightly different meaning?

    Let me explain:

  • Editor's Note - Ripple effect

    Note: A version of this column first ran in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette on Sept. 10, four days after Charles McDonald died in North Little Rock, Ark., at age 86.

    One really can’t frame the modern Civil Rights Movement between two specific events. There’s no one day that launched the movement, nor a single moment that brought it to an end.

    For my family, however, events that took place between 1957 and 1968 made all the difference in the world.

  • Another Perspective - Bullish on the state’s GOP

    Election Day was a tough one for Republicans. It was tough for our candidates, our volunteers and Gov. Martinez. Despite an investment of nearly $3 million by the governor and her related political action committees, a well-funded U.S. Senate race and an active GOP Victory operation, let’s not fool ourselves; the Republican Party frankly got wiped out.

    Although Republicans had a net gain of three seats in the state Senate, we experienced a net loss of at least two in the House of Representatives, thus dashing our hopes of taking control of this chamber.  

  • Nuestra Historia - ... sometimes go awry: Raynolds, Long and Storrie

    He helped rebuild San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake, and had just completed the famed Rock Mile tunnel in that city, when he heard he might be needed in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

    He was told the land grant board in that faraway city was having trouble with its plans for a mammoth reservoir and irrigation project, which was at a standstill after D.A. Camfield gave up in frustration and abandoned the project in 1912.

  • Another Perspective - Overcoming New Mexico’s challenges

    The 2012 election season was one of the most divisive, partisan and personal that New Mexico has faced. It will be hard and it will take time to heal the wounds, but it is critical that we do so and move away from campaigning and toward governing as fast as possible if we are to make any progress overcoming the tremendous challenges facing New Mexico.

  • Work of Art - Ultima, ultimately

    The first time many of us saw Rudolfo Anaya was when he spoke to Highlands students and staff in a packed Sala de Madrid, around 1972.

    He had just completed his first — and in my opinion, his best — novel, “Bless Me, Ultima,” now a movie that my family and I saw at a multi-screen theater in Santa Fe last weekend.

  • Editor's Note - Home and family

    Eight years.

    That’s how long I’ve lived in Las Vegas. Long enough to have become familiar with the community and its people, but not nearly long enough to become anything other than an outsider, at least to some people.

    I guess I don’t mind. I was born and raised in Arkansas, and yet I’ve always felt sort of different there too.

    Unless I’m with my family. There, I belong.

  • Nuestra Historia - The best laid plans of mice and men ...

    When the territorial legislature yanked the Las Vegas Land Grant from the Hispanic community in 1903, and placed it under the control of Judge William J. Mills, he immediately appointed an Anglo-dominated board of trustees to oversee the immense land grant.
    Headed by banker Jefferson Raynolds and former New Mexico chief justice Elisha V. Long, the “trustees” quickly decided the grant should be developed in earnest — to attract both outside investment and settlement.

  • Work of Art - Hey, the election’s over

    I want to shout out — to total strangers if necessary — “Hey, the election’s over.” Of course, I’m viewing this political theater through the eyes of someone who’s pleased with the results.

    Obama got re-elected, gaining about 125 more electoral votes than his opponent, Mitt Romney. Yet, bloggers, those who spend half their lives writing comments online, usually on Facebook, continue the assault.

    Let me explain:

  • Editor's Note - Voting for president in 2016

    With the 2012 presidential election still fresh in our minds, I’d like to propose to the little piece of America that reads my column a different approach for voters four years from now.

    But let me set the stage first, with a little perspective:

    We just witnessed perhaps the most misleading presidential campaigns of modern times. By one estimate, more than a million campaign ads ran on television, nearly all in nine or 10 swing states, mostly containing innuendo and half-truths to advance the candidates’ mudslinging agendas.