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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia: Primo Lorenzo ended Romero reign in Old Town

    We now move to the west side as we continue on the rocky road to consolidation, having recounted the relatively stable growth of New Town through the early 20th century, and into the 1930s — at least until mayor Tom Truder’s stormy tenure during that decade.

  • Work of Art — On tipping waiters

    BRANSON, MO. —The only things we ordered at an Irish pub in Branson, Mo., last week were a couple of chicken Philly sandwiches, a Ruben and spaghetti. It began as no big deal. But it grew.

    Let me explain:

  • Another Perspective - A revolution of the spirit

    By Lora Lucero

    A global revolution is stirring. I’m not referring to the Occupy Movement, Tahrir Square in Cairo, Taksim Square in Istanbul, the 350.org climate actions or any of the other engaged and enraged protests. Although each is very important and connected, I’m talking about a revolution of the spirit.   

  • Nuestra Historia: New Town tranquil until Tom Truder

    We return to the rocky road to consolidation of East and West Las Vegas, which we began some weeks ago, but interrupted with a fiestas column and to remember Gov. David Cargo. The consolidation series was introduced with a photograph of East and West mayors Ben Lingnau and Chief Gonzales burying the hatchet at the bridge the night of Feb. 27, 1968, when voters on both sides of the Gallinas approved the public referendum merging the two towns.

  • Another Perspective - Free summer meals around the corner

    Children need access to healthy food all year long because good nutrition provides the sound foundation they need to learn, grow and thrive. As USDA’s under secretary for food, nutrition and consumer services, it pleases me to say that during the regular school year, America’s schoolchildren can depend on the science-based nutrition provided by National School Lunch Program meals and the healthy choices now available at school. But when school is out during the summer months, it’s another story. Many kids don’t have access to even one nutritious meal a day.

  • Work of Art — Zip-adee-do, Dad!

    “Nice going, Hemingway!” I thought to myself as this 230-pound body, tethered to a harness, sped down a slope called Inspiration Point, near Branson, Mo.

    Imagine a 75-year-old man fantasizing about running with the bulls in Pamplona, Spain, a subject Ernest Hemingway wrote about, or in the style of George Plimpton, imagining that an average writer would play quarterback for the Detroit Lions, the inspiration for “Paper Lion,” a book and movie about such an accomplishment.

  • Another Perspective - The right to ban fracking

    Splashed across the front pages of the Optic several weeks ago, Danelle Smith’s legal opinion on the constitutionality of the Las Vegas anti-fracking ordinance has certainly drawn some attention.

    But what Smith’s opinion doesn’t mention is even more important than what it does.

    Indeed, you could look through it for hours — days even ­— and you’d fail to find an answer to the one basic legal question that Smith specifically avoided.

  • Nuestra Historia: How Gov. Cargo won San Miguel County, twice

    Gov. David Cargo loved San Miguel and Mora counties, and never tired of expressing his affection for the people of this area. A Republican, he was especially proud that both times he ran for governor he carried San Miguel County, a Democratic bastion.

  • Another Perspective - Schools not funded adequately

    Recent events at Las Vegas City Schools surrounding the budget have led to finger pointing and confusion. The local teachers’ union has resisted another cut in pay for teachers (in exchange for days off), also known as furlough days. Some people think that jobs may have been saved had the local NEA leadership agreed to the furloughs. While this may be true, there’s more to it than that.

  • Work of Art — Fiestas: They’ve changed

    It seemed that the whole town made elaborate preparations for the 4th of July festivities. Certainly not to be left out, my sisters must have spent weeks perfecting their fiesta dresses, those white, lacey outfits held together at the waist, tamale-style, with a metal belt.