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Columns

  • Work of Art - Political ads can be cruel

    Have you noticed how much vitriol fills virtually every TV and radio commercial as a prelude to Tuesday’s midterm election? It’s everywhere. And notice how often the name of Bill Richardson, our former U.S. representative and two-term governor, is invoked.

    I wonder whether such attack ads make a difference. Quite popular are those that accuse the opponent of having engaged in a secret deal that enriched that person. Otherwise, campaign managers portray the candidate as incompetent.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Think New Mexico and its latest campaign

    There are two things in particular that I like about Think New Mexico: It’s nonpartisan and it’s pragmatic.

    Both are reasons why this homegrown think tank is so effective. From getting the sales tax lifted off food to making full-day kindergarten accessible to all New Mexico children, whenever this 15-year-old group tackles an issue, things start to happen.

  • Editorial Roundup - Oct. 24, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    The Journal Record  on bias (Oct. 20):
    Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to take up several cases about same-sex marriage. The justices let stand rulings that say states have no basis to deny marriage to gay couples.
    Anyone who has followed the debate could predict what opponents would say in response. Mary Fallin’s statement was typical:

  • Work of Art - Where’d we all come from?

    It’s hard to imagine that the staff of Dr. Cordell Halverson’s office will ever forgive (or at least forget) my deception. Halverson, a long-time Ob/Gyn, had my wife, Bonnie, as one of his patients. His office was at Eighth and University, close to Highlands.

    At the time, Bonnie was teaching school in Anton Chico. I received a call from her (in that pre-cell phone era), at my office, in Mortimer Hall, telling me she’d forgotten to deliver a certain specimen to Halverson’s office, on her way to work that morning.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Managing economic development

    A story came out recently in my hometown newspaper that I think people who live in other small towns and cities around New Mexico might relate to.

  • Nuestra Historia - Eugenio Romero wins, East bolts

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    The stage was set for the momentous election to choose the first mayor of the combined city of east and west Las Vegas. It was July 18, 1882, and the racially charged contest was an obvious and heated struggle between Hispanics in Old Town, and Anglos in New Town, whose population in just three years equaled or exceeded that of the west side.

  • Editorial Roundup - Oct. 17, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    Wall Street Journal on ISIS (Oct. 8):
    A month ago President Obama ordered the world’s greatest military “to degrade and ultimately destroy” the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. America’s word isn’t what it used to be. As we went to press on Tuesday, ISIS was on the verge of a major military victory in Kobani, a mostly Kurdish city along Syria’s border with Turkey.

  • Work of Art — Can’t do without it

    Necessity is the mother of invention. Or is it the other way around? Doesn’t it happen that a new gadget we’d never dreamed of suddenly becomes a necessity we can’t be without?

    Let me explain:

    Not a tekkie by any means, I nevertheless felt stranded, branded, abandoned and empty-handed by the cell phone I forgot to take to my meeting Monday morning. And as evidence of my non-tekkieness, I didn’t join the gadget generation until later in the game. We didn’t get our cell phone until eight years ago.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Health facilities an issue of survival for small towns

    New Mexicans should be tired of all the state rankings, since they only seem to show us as the worst, or among the worst, in such issues as poverty, education, child welfare and more. So forgive me when I say, I’ve got one more — emergency services.

    I ran into this particular ranking in the AARP Bulletin, a monthly publication that I receive for getting old and paying my old-folks dues. I read about it in the Bulletin, but really it’s the American College of Emergency Physicians that sounded the alarm.

  • Nuestra Historia - Gazette, Optic feud over Mexicans, one LV

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    Within a year of the railroad’s arrival in 1879, the population in east Las Vegas equaled that of west Las Vegas, and between the two communities there was great activity and bustling enterprise. As a result, businessmen in particular began to see the need for basic services which only a municipal government could provide.

    There was also an alarming need for organized law enforcement, as mayhem and violence were becoming prevalent.