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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - The formidable Don Eugenio

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    Born in 1837, Eugenio Romero was two years younger than his brother Trinidad. In 1882 he was elected the first and only mayor of the combined city of east and west Las Vegas, before the eastside broke away and established itself as a separate municipality. (Don Eugenio alone held this distinction for almost 90 years, until the consolidation of our municipalities in 1970).

  • Editorial Roundup - July 4, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press
    The Terre Haute Tribune-Star on the need for CASA volunteers (June 28, 2014):
    If you agree that not much is sadder — and potentially more unsettling to our society — than a child torn from his or her home, here is a way you can make a difference, one kid at a time.

  • Work of Art: What? No Mozart?

    HALLSTATT, Austria — We’re a number of kilometers from the spot I thought we’d be on this day, but the pleasant weather makes us regret nothing at all. As we left Las Vegas for our summer trip overseas, that took us from Albuquerque, to Dallas, to London, then to Prague, in the Czech Republic. I expected to be in Salzburg today, savoring every note Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart ever wrote.

  • Another Perspective: Lessons learned in Vegas

    Editor’s note: Baillie Kujath, Yalda Barlas and Myra Murillo, UNM BA/MD students, participated in a rural practicum this summer in Las Vegas. The students shadowed local rural physicians Dr. David Elliott, Dr. Thomas Strain and Dr. L. David Young and participated in weekly tutorial sessions at Luna Community College with UNM faculty member Sally Bachofer and community coordinator Elaine Luna. Baillie Kujath wrote this piece on behalf of the BA/MD students.

  • Nuestra Historia - Trinidad goes to Washington

    As concerns the next several columns in particular, I humbly acknowledge the scholarly writings of Ralph Emerson Twitchell, Lynn Perrigo and Maurilio Vigil, as well as the personal history imparted to me by Don Miguel Romero’s great-grandson, John Paul Taylor, and by my dear friend since childhood, Arabella Romero Aragón, Don Miguel’s great-great-granddaughter.

  • Editorial Roundup - June 27, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    Kearney Hub on how student debt puts graduates in a deep hole (June 20):
    Should college graduates be allowed to refinance their student loans at today’s lower market rates, as other borrowers can do for mortgages and consumer loans? That was the question posed last week in a student loan bill before the U.S. Senate.

  • Just a Thought - May the winds be always at your back

    By Rick Kraft

  • Nuestra Historia - The extraordinary Romero Brothers

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    In the first years of his freighting business, Miguel Romero and his five sons, and other family members, made the long journeys on the Santa Fe Trail themselves, from Las Vegas to St. Louis, Missouri and the great Mississippi River. Within a short time, however, Don Miguel was able to hire and provide for the many teamsters who would drive his wagons and caravans along the Trail, a journey of two months, as described in our previous column.

  • Editorial Roundup - June 20, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    Chattanooga (Tennessee) Times on homeless veterans (June 17):
    Fixing the problem of homeless veterans — actually of all homelessness — is much harder than it sounds. Even with sufficient resources, homelessness is problem that keeps coming back if we lose focus. And we have.
    Still, in recent weeks we’ve made plans for a new day with a new group of disillusioned, disaffected people — especially the veterans among them.

  • Work of Art: ‘That’s nicht German’

    We read often about the disappearances of languages. Bill Bryson, the author of “The Mother Tongue: English and How It Got That Way,” estimates that currently, there are 2,700 languages; throughout history, many have died; perhaps there have been more language deaths than there are currently extant languages.