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Columns

  • Dulcey Amargo - A whopping 21 percent

    A couple of weeks ago, I ventured forth to attend my 50th class reunion, looking forward to the event in my hometown of Gallup. The event included classes of ’63,’64 and ’65, so I anticipated celebrating with a fairly large contingent of former friends.

    Well, there were about 12 of my classmates of the Cathedral High School class of ’64 present, two from the class of ’63, and one from ’65. Some were accompanied by spouses, bringing the total to about 28 or so, or a whopping 21 percent … not an overwhelming crowd, for sure.

  • Nuestra Historia - “An American town ... by Americans only”

    By Jesus L. Lopez

  • Work of Art: God created zucchini

    When God created zucchini, was He was playing a monumental joke on humankind in giving us a bland, tasteless, mushy-feeling omni-present veggie?

    I believe the creator hoped to watch our expressions as we attempt to down that slick food that’s so prolific it ought to be named “rabbit.” Someone should write a book and title it, “How to Stop Growing Zucchini and Rabbits.”

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Election-year issues that will and won’t matter

    In the wake of the Labor Day weekend comes the campaign for Election 2014, in earnest.

    All the noise you’ve heard so far was just the warm-up. Now comes the hyperbole, followed by a big dose of overkill.

    Still, it’s an important election. On every New Mexico ballot this November, there will be boxes to check for governor and lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer, auditor, land commissioner, U.S. senator and representative and five state constitutional amendments.

  • Nuestra Historia - Railroad by-passed Las Vegas

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    By 1871 there existed a transcontinental railroad across the United States, spanning the northern Great Plains, and soon plans were in place to run a rail line to the Southwest, roughly along the route of the Santa Fe Trail. Thus was commenced a new railway from Topeka, Kansas, to Santa Fe. (As early as 1863 the Atchison & Topeka Railroad added Santa Fe to its company name, when it decided that New Mexico’s capital city would be the southern destination of its rail line.)

  • Editorial Roundup - Sept. 12, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    The Tribune, Seymour on common sense and guns (Sept. 4):
    A little girl’s life was changed forever. A man’s life was brought to an abrupt end. A nation is left to wonder why and how it all happened.
    Recently, reports emerged from Arizona that a 9-year-old New Jersey girl had accidentally shot her firing-range instructor with an Uzi submachine gun. The instructor, 39-year-old Charles Vacca, was standing next to the girl when she squeezed the trigger.

  • Work of Art: Another ‘like’ column?

    A number of years and columns ago, I promised I wouldn’t be writing any more on the overuse of “like.” But like a traitor to the cause, I’m preparing just one more, hoping that by being nauseatingly whining, I can help cure the problem.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Football takes a pounding

    It’s happening in stadiums all over the country. Football! — America’s most popular sport.

    It’s my favorite sport too, but that doesn’t mean I can turn a blind eye to the severe health consequences that can happen to those who participate.

  • Nuestra Historia - Las Vegas before the A.T. & S.F

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    Las Vegas prospered for almost a half century before the railroad arrived in 1879. During that short span beginning in 1835, our town saw expansive growth and change. Because of its prime location along the Santa Fe Trail, Las Vegas experienced more bustle and flurry than any other place in New Mexico.

    In the 50 years before the railroad, our town witnessed first-hand the major transformative developments of the time, and more than any other place in New Mexico, Las Vegas was at the cross roads of history.

  • Editorial Roundup - Sept. 5, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    Kearney Hub on lawmakers ignoring immigration realities (Aug. 29):
    The problem with U.S. immigration policy is that it makes legal entry into the country so expensive, time-consuming and risky that instead of entering through the front door, foreigners are sneaking in through the back door — illegally.