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Today's News

  • Legislature caps session by leaving governor several bills to sign

    By Andrew Oxford, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE — Vote early and vote less often.
    At least, that is the hope behind a bill that was headed to the governor’s desk on Thursday to consolidate various local elections in New Mexico.

    Under a compromise hashed out between the Senate and House of Representatives during the last couple hours of this year’s 30-day legislative session, election day for most cities, towns and villages — including Santa Fe — would not change from the usual date in March.

  • Tax incentive for hiring foster youth heads to governor

    By Cynthia Miller, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE —  Micaela Baca arrived at the state Capitol early Wednesday with her 10-month-old son, Azariah, and a group of other young people hoping to witness a vote in the House of Representatives that would be the final hurdle for a measure they had been pushing throughout the legislative session.

  • Slate of domestic violence measures on governor’s desk

    By Cynthia Miller, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE — If Gov. Susana Martinez signs a Senate bill into law, New Mexico will become the 46th state to specifically define strangulation as a serious violent crime.

    State Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto, D-Albuquerque, who sponsored Senate Bill 61, called the Legislature’s unanimous support of the measure “a monumental achievement.”

  • Legislature approves nearly $180M in funds for capital projects

    By Steve Terrell, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE — There have been years in which there was much more money for brick-and-mortar projects in the state.

    But thanks to a rebound in gas and oil revenues, New Mexico has far more severance tax funds this year than last. And that means a lot more money for roads, senior centers, sewage plants and government buildings around the state, including a new state vital records bureau building in Santa Fe, as well as an expansion of the municipal airport’s parking facility.

  • Legislature In Brief, Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018

    The Santa Fe New Mexican

    Invoking Teddy: Rep. Bill McCamley, one of the Roundhouse’s more verbose lawmakers, gave a long, emotional farewell speech Thursday.

    Actually, McCamley recited former President Teddy Roosevelt’s speech from 1910 about being in the arena.

  • Jail Log, Sunday's Optic, Feb. 18, 2018

    The following individuals were booked into the San Miguel County Detention Center between Feb. 10 and Feb. 13, 2018:
    Phillip Conway Trujillo, Adult Probation Warrant; Possession, Delivery Or Manufacture Of Drug Paraphernalia, Las Vegas Municipal Court.
    Fidel Garcia, Driving On Suspended / Revoked License, San Miguel Magistrrate / Sandoval County.
    Jason A. Jaramillo, Felony Warrant, San Miguel District Court.
    Misty Martinez, Bench Warrant, Bernalillo Metro Court.

  • NMHU has welcome center, visit specialist

    By Margaret McKinney, N.M. Highlands University

    New Mexico Highlands University recently launched a new Welcome Center and other campus visit services geared toward prospective student’s individual academic interests.
    Crystal Burch is the new campus visit specialist at Highlands.

    Burch has worked in higher education for nearly seven years. Previously, she served as Highlands’ admissions specialist in the Office of Student Recruitment and Undergraduate Admissions.

  • Picking from two extremes

    A recent political cartoon, published in New Mexico’s largest newspaper, seems to have stirred up more discussion, fallout and venom than nearly all the cartoons published during the unprecedentedly brutal 2016 election cycle.

  • Three more bad ideas to reform higher education

    New Mexico’s higher education was, once again, on the minds of many of our elected officials during this year’s legislative session, and  lots of ideas to improve our state’s higher education have echoed around the statehouse.

    Some ideas had merit. Some did not.

    Here are three bad ideas I recently heard:

  • Making the next time the best ever

    By Rick Kraft

    The best time ever might be the next time. Maybe, just maybe, by giving it all that you have, the next time will be the best.

    On July 5, 1969, a band who called themselves “The Rolling Stones” broke through onto the music scene when they performed a free concert in Hyde Park, England. More than 200,000 attended the event.