Today's News

  • The best part of life

    Music has always been a large part of my life.

    Since I was little my dad used to make me watch the movie Amadeus with him, so I could learn about Mozart and classical music. We watched musicals together, such as My Fair Lady, Grease, Jesus Christ Superstar, and The Sound of Music, which are still all some of my favorites.

  • Singing Sondheim

    The New Mexico Highlands Concert Choir will perform works by one of America’s most distinguished Broadway composers and lyricists for its spring program April 20 at 3 p.m. in Ilfeld Auditorium. directed the program, Singing Sondheim, will include a wide variety of selections from such well known musicals as “Sweeny Todd,” “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” and “Into the Woods.”

    The program will be directed by Andr Garca-Nuthmann, Music Department program director, with Lydia Madrick at the piano.

  • Luna sponsors multicultural concert

    In an effort to promote leadership and unity, both the Luna Community College and New Mexico Highlands University student government will sponsor a multicultural/spring concert from noon to 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 19 at the LCC campus.

    Admission to for the general public is $5. Luna Community College and Highlands University students get in free.

    Tickets are being sold at the Luna Community College ACCESS Center, Urban Wear, Love Music and Hacienda.

  • Officers arrest 5 in home invasion

    A man and four youths were arrested in connection with a invasion of a home on the east side.

    George Sena, 22, 1028 Second St., was arrested on charges of robbery, conspiracy, two counts of aggravated assault and four counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

    Two 17-year-olds and two 16-year-olds were also charged in connection with the alleged invasion.

    Police said the alleged victim let in Sena as a friend into his house in the 2300 block of Calle Bonita around 11:30 p.m. Monday. Then the four youths came in, officials said.

  • Students: Housing conditions bad

    Students on Tuesday aired their complaints about Highlands University’s housing, including allegations of mold growing on walls and in vents, broken toilets, holes in walls, blood- and urine-stained mattresses and exposed electrical wiring.

    They met with the administration at the university’s student senate chambers.

  • Board gets new president

    Patrick Romero is the new president of the Las Vegas City Schools board after a vote to reorganize.

    Ramon “Swoops” Montao nominated Romero for the position, followed by a 4-1 vote to seat him. Philip Leger, who had nominated incumbent president Elaine Luna, was the lone no vote.

  • Speed limits lowered

    The state will be requiring drivers to reduce their speed on much of Grand Avenue — by 5 mph.

    Based on a traffic study, the state Transportation Department is reducing the speed limit from 55 mph to 50 mph on Grand north of Mountain View Drive to Interstate 25, 45 mph to 40 mph from Mills Avenue to Mountain View and 35 mph to 30 mph from Washington Street to Mills.

    The changes take effect Friday.

  • Suspect admits to multiple sex crimes

    A man charged with inappropriately touching seven underage victims and hurting an adult pleaded guilty to most of the crimes Tuesday.

    But Clifford Gutierrez, 34, of Cleveland, N.M., didn’t get any prison time — a decision the victims’ families apparently supported.

    Under the terms of a plea agreement, Gutierrez will serve at least five years of probation and must live in Albuquerque-based Bernalillo County or suburban Sandoval County. He also must register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.

  • 5 in running for superintendent

    The Las Vegas City Schools board on Tuesday narrowed the list of eight applicants for the superintendent’s position to five.

  • Third-grade class studies dinosaurs

    Students in Nina Melendrez’s third-grade class at Paul D. Henry Elementary are becoming junior paleontologists by learning about dinosaurs, their habitat and the time they walked the earth.

    “Kids will always be interested in dinosaurs. It doesn’t matter how young or how old they are. The love it; it’s such a high interest topic that you can do anything and everything with it,” Melendrez said.

    Christina Padilla studied the allosaurus and will write a report and give an oral presentation on the giant reptile.