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Today's News

  • Robertson High puts its troublemakers on notice

    The Las Vegas City Schools will be on the lookout for bullies, truants, and alcohol and drug users as the district starts a new front to combat troublemakers, officials say. The main focus will be Robertson High School.

    Principal Richard Lopez said this plan isn’t being carried out solely to address any particular incident.

  • Las Vegas is as much fun as you make it

    I’ve heard it said that all small towns are alike. Generally, I disagree. Towns, because they are made up of the people who live in them, are very much like people themselves. Each one has its own personality.

  • Classes prepare for turkey day

    Kids in classrooms all over the city have been getting ready for turkey day by learning the history of the holiday, many drawing pictures of traditional and local scenes, holding turkey talent shows and thinking about a tummy full of turkey and pumpkin pie.

    Students at Tony Serna Elementary were getting a history lesson from district art teacher Fred Silva, who was talking about many of the local dishes found on tables in northern New Mexico.

  • Raptors descend on Las Vegas

    Laura Swartz lifted her arm parallel to floor. A red-tailed hawk dug into her denim shirt. The steady arch of his beak feigned nonchalance, but his eyes captured every tiny motion in the room.

    Swartz wore a heavy canvas glove for protection. Her movements were sure, rehearsed. She spread the hawk’s right wing. An audience of forty Las Vegas residents leaned forward to examine the raptor’s plumage.

  • Inside the Capitol

    SANTA FE — Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays. One of the reasons is that Americans still remember why we celebrate it. Thanksgiving isn’t just another holiday to which we give not one thought other than that it is a day off work.

    Nearly all of us truly remember to give thanks and truly celebrate the holiday. Unlike Christmas, there is no stress around giving and getting presents. The purpose of celebrating Thanksgiving is very simple and very easy to observe.

  • Leadership toward unity

    Ours is a religiously eclectic community. Were mostly Catholic but theres also a strong Protestant presence, and beyond those theologies we have every kind of faith-based prospective imaginable and just about all of us are OK with that.

    Of course, the law of the land specifically our First Amendment right to worship as we please sets the national tone for religious tolerance but, still, there is a greater acceptance out here in the Southwest than in some other parts.

  • Luna's GED program may lose money, officials say

    Luna Community College’s GED program is on track, but it may lose funding within the next year, officials said last week.

    Officials told Luna’s Board of Trustees that because the program didn’t meet benchmarks previously, it may lose state money. The program is under guidelines to retain so many students at certain points during the school year, and the program had missed some targets previously, they said.

  • Ladino music to be performed at Ilfeld

    The Highlands University Department of Music will present “Songs of Hispania” in Ilfeld Auditorium on December 2 at 3 p.m. Andr Garca-Nuthmann will conduct the Madrigal Choir with Elizabeth Bunch at the piano.

    The chorus will begin with a group of haunting and rhythmic Sephardic folksongs sung in Ladino, the dialect spoken by Spanish Jews. Next, the choir will perform “Miserere” by Gregorio Allegri, and then finish the program with three lively songs in Spanish.

  • Board rejects charter school

    The Bridge Academy’s days appear to be numbered.

    The Las Vegas City Schools on Tuesday voted 3-2 against renewing the charter school’s charter, with board President Elaine Luna casting the deciding vote.

    Board members Ramon “Swoops” Montao and Phillip Vigil voted for the school to continue operation, while Luna, Patrick Romero and Philip Leger were against.

    Thirty-five students attend the school, which serves ninth- through 12th-graders.

  • Utility revisits number of trustees

    In the summer, members of the Mora-San Miguel Electric Cooperative voted to reduce the number of trustees from 11 to five — an attempt to reduce the utility’s costs.

    But that decision may soon be reversed.