.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Campos yet to get Luna contract

    More than two months ago, the Luna Community College Board of Trustees selected Pete Campos as the school’s next president.

    But the board has yet to approve a contract for Campos, a state senator and the superintendent of the Las Vegas City Schools.

    The trustees’ monthly meeting for March has been delayed twice, in part, because the school has yet to complete a contract for Campos, said Sigfredo Maestas, Luna’s interim president.

  • Official: Body was a coyote's

    Several weeks ago, officials announced that the body of a skinned and mutilated dog was found behind the Vital Arts building on Grand Avenue, but it now appears the body was not that of a dog.

    Pam Sandoval, a detective for the Las Vegas Police Department, said the report from the state’s forensic veterinarian is back and that the animal was a coyote.

    Sandoval also said the skinning of the animal was done by a professional trapper.

  • Public can't question candidates

    Las Vegas City Schools board member Patrick Romero wanted the public to take part in questioning of prospective superintendents at a future public forum, but members Phillip Vigil and Ramon “Swoops” Montao said no to that idea.

    Before the vote on the process for a procedure of hiring a superintendent, Vigil said, “I don’t mind the public being there while we interview them, but that’s the board’s job.”

  • Service business employees get trained about Vegas

    If an organization has its way, a store clerk or a restaurant waitress will have enough information about Las Vegas to interest tourists in visiting attractions around the area.

    The New Mexico Workforce Connection, which is a part of SER Jobs for Progress, has launched a program called Pro-Active Host, which provides training in customer service designed with local employees in mind.

  • State to fund specialty crops

    New Mexico Department of Agriculture announced today that funding will be available under the New Mexico Specialty Crops Program.

    Funds are available to New Mexico organizations and individuals that have a long-term commitment to improving the economic viability of New Mexico’s rural economy or have projects with a significant value-added potential.

  • Las Vegas' chicken laws

    Chickens are a godsend for organic gardeners and farmers. Needing only basic care, they sally forth into gardens, devouring with gusto pests such as grasshoppers and slugs which often decimate crops, and converting them into fertilizer and healthy, free range eggs and meat.

    But can chickens be legally kept in the city of Las Vegas? I asked Thomas Garza, Las Vegas' director of animal control; Garza said that chickens can be kept in the city, and helpfully provided the City's Animal Control Ordinance, which has this to say about keeping chickens:

  • Solar tax credits pay New Mexicans to go green

    Solar energy systems are good for the environment and good for your wallet. For every kilowatt-hour of electricity generated by solar energy instead of a coal-fired power plant, greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by two pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) and three-quarters of a gallon of water is saved.

  • Spinning truthful yarns

    The first thing that strikes the listener is that the woman’s voice is stone cold melodic, even, unafraid. She stands at a microphone, her head cocked to one side as she interlaces curt words, deliberate ideas, into a rug tightly-woven enough to carry weight. Her gestures suggest necessary defiance, the aural transfer of sacred inalienable truth.

  • HU dorm project set to start soon

    Highlands University has taken another step toward making an upscale residence hall a reality on the Las Vegas campus.

    The Highlands University Board of Regents last week approved a bond purchase agreement with the New Mexico Finance Authority that will be used to build the dorms.

    “What the board did is approve the agreement between Highlands and the NMFA to actually generate the construction revenue that’s going to be needed to build the new residence facilities,” board Chairman Javier Gonzales said.

  • Memorial Middle School goes green

    At Memorial Middle School, students don’t just talk about the environment — they get hands-on lessons.

    The Memorial Middle School agricultural science center emphasizes agricultural, horticultural and natural resource science. Students are learning about science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, as they grow their own fruits and vegetables, build wind turbines and learn about solar power.