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Today's News

  • Native American pageant held

    The Winter Buffalo Dance may have been the key to Kaylina Abeyta’s victory.

    Kaylina Abeyta, a member of the Ohkay Owingeh tribe, was crowned Miss Highlands University Native American Queen during the third annual Native American Pageant at Sala de Madrid last week. She replaces outgoing Queen Courtney Hudson.

    Abeyta wowed the audience with the Winter Buffalo Dance and said she’s been dancing since she was a little girl.

  • Hospital adds administrative post

    The state hospital says it has created a new management position to make the facility more efficient.

    Morris Madrid, the hospital’s finance director for the last couple of years, has been appointed to the newly created position of director of operational efficiencies.

    “In light of the current budget and economic conditions, he has graciously agreed to accept this role without additional compensation,” hospital administrator Troy Jones said in a memo to employees last week.

  • Man who fed millions of birds over his career retiring

    Jean Jaureguiberry, a 32-year employee of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is leaving the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge and the many, many birds he has fed over his long career.

    This month, Jaureguiberry will hang up his tractor keys and lay down his gloves to retire and begin a new chapter of his life.

  • EDITORIAL: Don't ruin a good thing

    Parents of students at Union Elementary take a special pride in their school. It’s small, and its students have been testing very well compared to others across the state.

    For some years now, the West Las Vegas district has been considering moving Union classes to Tony Serna Elementary and transferring the Family Partnership to Union.

    The school board should think long and hard before putting this plan into action. We’d hate to see a good thing end.

  • LETTER: Health, other issues must be considered

    I am an off-grid, parttime resident of the Wrye Ranch area on the mesa south of Starvation Peak in San Miguel County and I am an advocate of alternative energy. However, I was recently  concerned about the plans described for the La Sierrita Wind Project in the “Residents Wary of the Mesa Wind Farm Deal” article in The New Mexican, dated Nov. 13, 2008.

  • SEASON PREVIEW: Robertson boys basketball a work in progress

    “When I took the job, I understood the challenge that I was going to face.”

    A quote from president-elect Barack Obama? Good guess. Try new Robertson boys’ basketball coach David Bustos.

    Bustos, who led boys’ teams at West Las Vegas and more recently Pecos deep into the state tournament, is trying to build a winner at RHS. But he acknowledges that it will be a marathon rather than a sprint.

  • Storrie Project also left out of loop

    Members of the Las Vegas City Council apparently weren’t the only key players left out of the loop when the city administration quietly tried to change the intent of more than $1 million for a water project.

    Robert Quintana, president of the Storrie Project Water Users Association, said Monday that no one informed his group about the change either — and the association was very much involved in the issue.

  • LETTERS: Mil Gracias

    Mil Gracias

    The Las Vegas Special Olympics would like to thank all the businesses that donated items for our fundraiser raffle sales. We would also like to thank everyone that brought raffle tickets. With the help of all the community and surrounding areas, our athletes will be able to participate in the next upcoming sport.

  • HU students go to Mexico

    Social work students at Highlands University went to Mexico recently to improve their bilingual skills.

    Thirteen students from Highlands University’s one-of-a-kind Social Work Bilingual-Bicultural Master’s Program completed a successful exchange with the University of Chihuahua School of Social Work in Mexico this fall.

  • COLUMN: From Richardson to Denish

    SANTA FE — To paraphrase an old love song, “Changing administrations is hard to do.” It’s especially true in tough times after a long romance of voters by both sides.

    We are getting smarter, however. When Franklin Roosevelt beat incumbent Herbert Hoover in 1932, he had to wait until March to take over. Now the date is Jan. 20.  New Mexico switches over on Jan. 1. That may be an even better idea.