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Today's News

  • Residents talk about police

    A crowd estimated at more than 100 people came together over the weekend to talk about alleged police misconduct in Las Vegas.

    The standing-room-only crowd, which filled the VFW hall on Mills Avenue, included several officials, including Assistant District Attorney Tom Clayton and City Council members Andrew Feldman and Diane Moore.

    Council members Morris Madrid and Cruz Roybal weren’t present. Neither was Mayor Tony Marquez.

  • West doesn’t renew some contracts

    The West Las Vegas school district recently decided against renewing the contracts of more than 10 non-tenured employees, but the superintendent said the district hasn’t triggered the formal process known as a reduction in force.

    A few weeks ago, some school board members questioned whether a reduction in force was planned this year because of budgetary constraints. Abreu told the members that he was doing all he could to prevent that from happening.

  • RHS booster club to meet

    The Robertson High School Football Booster Club is meeting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the football fieldhouse. The public is welcome. For more information, call 454-7037.

  • LETTER: Questions and answers

    Question: Who said this?

    “Ratification of the Convention (against Torture) by the United States will clearly express United States’ opposition to torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately still prevalent in the world today.

  • EDC hiring new director

    The Las Vegas-San Miguel Economic Development Corp. is getting a new executive director.

    Roberto Rios, a New Mexico native, will take the reins today as the new director. He has years of experience in the area of economic development.

    “I want to come back home to New Mexico,” Rios said in a telephone interview last week. “My wife and I look forward to being contributing members of the community.”

  • LETTER: Consider a civilian review board

    When a police officer does a bad thing, it shocks the public and rightfully so.

    Certain rights are guaranteed to our citizens through amendments to the Constitution and those rights should never be infringed upon by law enforcement officers acting under color of law.

  • Woman's charge reduced

    The district attorney’s office last week reduced the charge for a woman charged in the killing of a man.

    Bernadette Sanchez, 36, a resident charged in the stabbing death of Timoteo M. Jaramillo, never entered the courtroom for a scheduled preliminary hearing Thursday on the case before Magistrate Judge Chris Najar.

    Najar said the state had reduced the charge from second-degree murder to voluntary manslaughter and waived the charge of tampering with evidence.

    “So we will not be having this hearing today,” Najar said.

  • LETTER: Outraged by official reactions

    I am absolutely disgusted by the actions, not only of the police officer involved in the recent story that ran in the paper about a woman being allegedly abused, but by the actions of police Chief Gary Gold and District Attorney Richard Flores. This officer, at the very least, should have been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation of the allegations, but instead the chief states that he is still on duty because it was a personnel matter?...

  • LETTER: Wind turbines create uncertainty

    I used to live around Bernal, right at the foot of Starvation Peak. Cleofes Ortiz was my landlord, friend and neighbor. I lived there for several years in the ‘70s, had owned property in the area and was currently hoping to find a nice parcel to build a passive solar adobe. My wife and I looked at a few properties in the Blanchard area and would have bought a charming eight-acre site we like until we learned of the proposed wind farm in Rowe Mesa.

  • City to look at utility rates

    The city plans to hire a consultant to study rates for water, wastewater, solid waste and natural gas, the mayor says.

    Officials expect the study to include the creation of a water rate structure that would encourage conservation and a review of the basis for sewer charges, according to a city press release. It would also examine the controversial transfer of money from the utilities to the city’s general fund, which pays for everything from police to parks.