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Today's News

  • Letter: Not a problem for the dog owner

    I have a large dog. Over the years I have feared he may someday bite someone other than the “bad guy,” so I have been exceptionally careful to protect him and others from something going “terribly wrong.”

    I have recently learned, however, that nothing would happen to my dog or myself if he were to viciously attack an innocent passerby walking his or her dog. No, my 87-pound Chow mix could silently charge and attack a naïve citizen and his or her dog and I would have no worries.

  • Letter: Community banks aren’t the problem

    The U.S. Congress is considering a proposal to create a new mega-regulator designed to address abusive financial practices. Not only would this approach undermine small community banks and cause more harm than good, but it also misses the best opportunity to protect consumers: namely, addressing the too-big-to-fail concentration risks among our nation’s biggest banks that have cost Americans over $7 trillion in economic worth.

  • Letter: Government run vs. privately run

    On Sept. 1, I made a transition from health insurance provided by my former employer to Medicare and a Medicare supplement. Perhaps my story has some relevance to the larger health care debate raging the past few months. Certainly it seemed so to me.

  • Highlands to sponsor golf fundraiser

    New Mexico Highlands University’s athletic department is hosting an upcoming golf tournament to benefit its scholarship fund.

    The inaugural NMHU Athletics Golf Tournament is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 11, at the Pendaries Village Golf Course in Rociada, north of town.

    Players may enter individually ($150 fee covers the cost of green fees, cart and dinner) or in groups of four ($500 per group).

    The tournament is also selling hole sponsorships at $250 per hole.

  • Editorial: A big speech

    At 6 p.m. today, President Obama is going to speak to Congress about health care reform. It’s a big speech in that he needs to convince not only Congress but the American public that we’re better off passing some real health care reforms now rather than putting it off, again, until who knows when.

  • Editorial: Who's really full of it?

    The Optic has maintained for six months that state law requires the city of Las Vegas to release e-mails involving a quorum of the City Council.

    Our argument was pretty simple: The state Open Meetings Act mandates that governing bodies discuss public business in the open. And that law includes all forms of communication, including e-mail.

    But City Attorney Carlos Quiñones stood in the way of openness, as is too often the case at City Hall. He told the Optic that the city couldn’t find any e-mails on its server involving a quorum of the council.

  • Official explains why job not advertised

    The local District Court didn’t advertise a supervisor’s position in the court clerk’s office, instead filling it with an employee involved in a nepotism situation.

    Some employees have worked in the court clerk’s office for years, yet they didn’t have an opportunity to apply for the vacant position, which would have been a promotion.

    Rather, the Fourth Judicial District Court filled the position with Michelle Pino, who has served as District Judge Eugenio Mathis’ administrative secretary for a number of years.

  • Blues festival draws a crowd to King Stadium

    “You can’t sit still for the blues.” Mary Oishi, KUNM disc jockey, chided those sitting in the crowd for not getting to their feet and dancing to the live music at Casa de Cultura’s first “Ain’t Got no Frijoles Blues Festival.”

    Sunday’s event, which drew roughly 200 people, was conceived by Casa de Cultura’s director, Miguel Angel, both as a way to bring people together through culture and introduce them to the wonders of King Stadium.

    It succeeded.

  • Cowgirls, youth league team up

    It was a win-win situation for the sport of soccer in the Meadow City on Aug.30.

    The Las Vegas Youth Soccer League teamed up with New Mexico Highlands University’s women’s soccer team to hold a LVYSL Day that Sunday at Perkins Stadium.

  • Parts of conservation law ignored

    The city is considering revisions to its conservation ordinance, but some may wonder if the original has been strictly followed.

    The 2001 ordinance is most known for the stages of increasing water-use restrictions when supplies run low. The city has followed that procedure over the years.

    But other parts of the ordinance have gone by largely unnoticed — such as the portion about educating the community.