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Today's News

  • City deals with code violator

    On Wednesday night, Las Vegas resident Tony Ortega was called a “one-man wrecking crew for the image of Las Vegas.” And it was suggested that the city pursue criminal charges against Ortega.

    Last year, the city entered agreements with Ortega to clean up his properties in the Railroad Avenue area or the city would take care of the problems itself.

  • COLUMN: It's all about jobs

    Last week, members of the Luna Community College Board of Trustees expressed their displeasure with the decline in student enrollment, which plunged 7.3 percent within a year’s time.

    But if you look at the last few years, the number has been going up and down.

    When the number drops, that means less dollars from the state. Northeastern New Mexico is lightly populated, so there will come a point where we shouldn’t expect Luna’s numbers to rise anymore.

  • Judge asked to move case out of town

    A defense attorney wants to move the case involving the killing of a 6-year-old girl out of town because of emotional media coverage.

    Last September, David Levi Chavez, 21, was charged with an open count of murder in connection with the death of Jasmine Garcia, who had just graduated from kindergarten.

    Garcia was sleeping in her mother’s bed at 304 Union St. late on June 15, when a shot ripped through an outside wall facing the street, killing her. Authorities say that Chavez was aiming for Garcia’s uncle when he fired at the house.

  • Some question Cinder project

    San Miguel County officials want to add a 1.6-mile path for bicyclists and pedestrians along Cinder Road as part of a long-term plan to extend the city’s riverwalk.

    But some residents in the Cinder Road area have concerns about the proposed project.

    For the last few years, the county has been planning the path, which it hopes will extend all the way to Montezuma. The county’s portion would start 700 feet north of Mills, which is where the county’s unincorporated area begins.

  • Shop owner pleads guilty

    The owner of a local auto repair shop has pleaded guilty to attacking customers who owed him money.

    In plea agreements in January, Romero, 32, owner of Michael’s Precision Automotive, admitted to two counts of aggravated battery and one count of attempting to commit a felony, all of which are misdemeanors.

    As part of the agreements, prosecutors dropped charges of unlawful taking of a vehicle, robbery, kidnapping, extortion and intimidation of a witness.

    His attorney said this week that his client’s guilty pleas were a business decision.

  • EDITORIAL: It's politics as usual

    Isn’t home where you hang your hat? We thought so, but politicos often seem to struggle with this question.

    Last week, we reported on Manuel Lucero, the treasurer for the campaign of Tony Valdez, who ran successfully for a seat on the Luna Community College Board of Trustees.

  • Don Cecilio classes go to Union

    Union Elementary School is bustling as its student population doubled in January to accommodate kids from Don Cecilio Martinez Elementary, where one wing of the school is undergoing a complete renovation.

    Principal Delbert Saavedra said children from four classrooms in second, third, fourth and fifth grades made the move on Jan. 6, which effectively doubled the number of kids attending his school.

  • Mora County man accused in battery

    A Cleveland, N.M., man who went to his family’s house to talk out some of their differences ended up being arrested for allegedly attacking them.

    Robert Lawrence Romero, 22, was charged with two counts of aggravated battery on household members and criminal damage to property.

  • LETTER: It’s not broke, don’t try to fix it

    It is my belief that the Las Vegas City Council voted appropriately in their decision to not make Grand Avenue two lane for a five-block distance. Grand Avenue is an inter-city highway. It serves as a business loop through Las Vegas. It also serves as a route for emergency vehicles to traverse the city as well as to quickly exit to emergency situations on Interstate 25.

  • Luna says it’s improving hiring process

    A member of Luna Community College’s Board of Trustees says he appreciates that the school’s human resources department is developing a firm hiring process.

    “I have felt we have been too loosey-goosey in the past,” Trustee Abelino Montoya said at last week’s monthly meeting of the trustees. “I’ve had my doubts in the past about how we have hired people and how they came in.”

    Montoya said the school gets a lot of negative feedback on its hiring process.