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Today's News

  • City Council approves new rules for movie productions

    After weeks of debate, the City Council reached agreement Wednesday on new rules for film projects.

    Las Vegas has long been the setting for movies, dating back to 1913. But the projects have long been an irritation for merchants who complain they aren’t adequately compensated for resulting lost business

    Last month, business people turned in a petition calling for a moratorium on movie productions until the city could revise its ordinance for such projects. That set the city into action.

  • KEEPING IT SIMPLE: A 50-year assessment

    Fifty years ago in May, the Robertson High School Class of 1959 was instructed to report to Douglas Elementary School for last minute preparations (cap and gown) before graduation. Once everyone was ready and lined up, we quietly marched across the street to Ilfeld Auditorium, where school administrators, family and friends were waiting. There were no cell phones or digital cameras to be found!

  • Once in charge of local water

    Most people often take a lot of things for granted, like turning on the faucet expecting, water, the world’s most precious resource to flow.

    But Frank Armijo and his former colleagues, Ramon Vialpando, Edward Saavedra, Jerry Aguilar, Art Salazar and Larry Francis, at the Las Vegas water treatment plant know it takes a lot of work, using science, technology and years of experience to make water safe to drink.

  • THUMBS: Our high country lowdown on the news

    Thumbs up

    GRAND AVENUE IMPROVEMENTS, ANYWAY. We’re noticing two things regarding Grand Avenue that we like. One is that the New Mexico Department of Transportation is talking about other ways to spruce up this main thoroughfare through town, besides the two-lane proposal that’s been shot down. Paul Gray, the DOT’s district engineer, said trees can be planted, patterned concrete will be poured and better crosswalks will be painted into place.

  • EDITORIAL: City proposal opens the way

    Last month, downtown merchants presented a petition calling for the city to enact a moratorium on all new film projects while the city makes changes to its ordinance dealing with such activities.

    The business people contended that movie productions pay little heed to them when they’re filming. They say they don’t receive adequate compensation for their losses and that the companies don’t communicate well to residents about their schedules.

  • Madrid says he won’t run for re-election

    Las Vegas City Councilman Morris Madrid an-nounced this week that he wouldn’t run for a second term, but he left open the possibility of a mayoral bid.

    “Eit-her I’m going to play a larger leadership role or none at all. That’s a decision I have to make,” said Madrid, who was elected to represent the west side’s Ward 1 in 2006.

    Madrid, a top official at the state hospital, said he would make an announcement on his political plans next month.

  • Dealership says it has doubled sales since April

    The Enchantment car dealership is under new management and is reportedly seeing an increase in sales.

    Bill Scheid, the general manager and owner, took over the Ford and Chrysler dealership at the beginning of April. He hopes to close on deals with both auto companies to take official ownership.

    Enchantment’s products include Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep. It had been around for about three decades.

  • West officials want confirmation

    Three West Las Vegas school board members want a letter of confirmation from the state Public Education Department that the agency is fine with the district’s selection of an auditor.

    At issue is the board’s recent decision to hire Griego Professional Services as the auditor. Some members have expressed concern that he firm isn’t entirely independent because one of its employees, Jolene Perez, a former business manager for West, helped the district’s business office after leaving.

  • WORK OF ART: Taking a TV furlough

    The weekend was a great opportunity to live like an estimated 2.7 million people who went without.

    Less than 1 percent of the U.S. population watched blank TV screens, or nothing at all when the media industry converted from analog to digital. The rationale is simple: If you don’t already have cable or satellite and if you failed to acquire a converter box, your TV set went blank.

  • Residents say their wells going dry

    Last week, Susan Hayes, an Ojitos Frios resident, got a glass of water, but she couldn’t do the same thing a half hour later. Nothing came out of the faucet.

    A neighbor, Bill Pyles, said Monday he had just enough water in his well to fill up a bathtub. At certain times, it takes an hour for water in his well to build up enough to where family members can flush the toilet again.