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Today's News

  • Student center work to start soon

    Construction of Highlands University’s student center will start late this month or early next, officials say.

    Re-cently, the Highlands University Board of Regents awarded a contract for construction of the new student center to Makwa Construction of Albuquerque. The firm submitted the low bid of $16 million.

    President Jim Fries said Makwa was clearly the low bidder.

    “There was a great deal of interest in this project. In fact, we received 10 bids from major general contractors,” Fries said.

  • Q&A: LCC baseball's Antonio Siqueiros

    The following is an interview with Luna Community College baseball coach Antonio Siqueiros.

    How is the recruiting going so far this summer?

  • West leader gets new job

    West Las Vegas Superintendent Jim Abreu, whose contract expires at the end of the month, has found a new job.

    Abreu will become the new executive director of the Northeast Regional Education Cooperative, which is made up of the East, West, Mora, Wagon Mound, Pecos and Santa Rosa school districts.

    He will be taking the place of Lorenzo Marquez, who is retiring.

    The cooperative is based out of the education building at Highlands University, with a staff of nine full-time employees, plus a dozen contract consultants.

  • FFA teacher dies in crash

    Gary Leger, the national award-winning FFA teacher at Robertson High School, died in a car accident Wednesday evening,

    His brother, James Leger, said Thursday that the crash happened around 6:30 p.m. in Oklahoma and that his brother was airlifted to Amarillo. He died shortly after.

    James Leger said his brother apparently pulled away from a stop sign but didn’t see an oncoming car, which was the same color as the surroundings. The other car struck the driver’s side.

  • Editorial Thumbs

    Thumbs DOWN for ... RIGHTLY SUSPICIOUS. Is it too much to ask that our politicians be straight with us? San Miguel County Commissioner-elect Arthur Padilla is the latest politician struggling with the question about where he lives. He swore in a required affidavit that he lives at 711 Legion Drive. That’s where he’s registered to vote. But his son, who lives at that house, says his dad lives in Rociada. Padilla himself contends he lives at both places.

  • Another Perspective: Traffic citations matter

    Las Vegas, we have a problem. No one wants to talk about this huge white elephant in the room but everyone knows the problem.

    The problem is the blatant violation of traffic laws throughout town. We have speeding, illegal cell phone use, running stop signs and the list continues. Traffic laws are in place for public safety reasons and when we have a minority that ignores traffic laws it jeopardizes everyone’s safety.

  • Locals deliver in North victory

    As far as Dean Gallegos is concerned, one of the defining moments of the North-South baseball weekend came away from the field.

    One of the invitees to compete in the just-for-fun skills challenge on the eve of the series, West Las Vegas’ Michael Armijo volunteered to give that spot up in order to focus on the actual series.

  • City police not using Tasers
  • Nearby blaze partly contained

    The Tecolote fire was 10 percent contained as of Tuesday morning, officials said.

    The blaze, which started Friday night, has burned 700 acres. But the fire hasn’t struck any buildings, and no evacuations have been ordered.

    “No structures are immediately threatened. We’ve had people talk to homeowners,” said Denise Ottaviano, a U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman.

    The fire is on Bear Mountain, about 2.5 miles south of Gallinas Canyon. The blaze is raging on rugged terrain in the Santa Fe National Forest.

  • Governor visits Vegas

    Gov. Bill Richardson flew into town Monday to announce a $150,000 infusion of cash into Luna Community College’s film program.

    “We have one of the most successful movie programs in our history these last eight years. That’s because we have offered the movie companies incentives, free state land, loans, and as a result, we have had billions of dollars in direct and indirect benefits for the state,” Richardson said.