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Today's News

  • The mother ditch

    It’s on the National Register of Historic Places. It’s the largest historic structure in Las Vegas. And it’s one of the oldest. The original Spanish colonists of the area began building it as soon as they arrived, in the mid-1830s.

    What is it?

    If you guessed the Plaza Hotel, the Ilfeld Addition or for that matter any other building, you would be wrong.

    It is the Acequia Madre de Las Vegas, the mother ditch.

  • EDITORIAL: E-mails aren't private

    The dismissal of two employees at the state hospital, essentially for inappropriate behavior at work, illustrates a point that too many people forget: the e-mail account you use at work doesn’t belong to you.

  • Officials praise new city manager

    Las Vegas City Manager Timothy Dodge has been on the job for two weeks. So far, he is getting good reviews from the mayor and the City Council.

    By a unanimous vote, the council earlier this month appointed Dodge, a Highlands University graduate who had been Santa Rosa’s city manager for the last four years.

    At Wednesday’s council meeting, Councilwoman Diane Moore said she had seen Dodge plenty of times during the last two weeks, but not at his office. She said he has been out at meetings and other places, getting to know the community.

  • Policy would let landlords off the hook

    Landlords would be off the hook for their tenants’ debts to the city utilities department under a proposed ordinance.

    For the last few years, landlords have been held liable if their tenants skipped off without paying their utility bills — a policy that angered many landlords.

  • EDITORIAL: Taking a stand

    It’s an old story, but with a new twist. In 2007, nearly two-thirds of the employees at Alta Vista Regional Hospital voted to unionize, with District 1199 of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees representing their interests at the bargaining table. But Alta Vista’s parent company, Community Health Systems, has refused to sit down with the union, and raised legal objections at every turn in an attempt to usurp the election results.

  • Leader’s contract renewed

    The Las Vegas City Schools board gave Superintendent Rick Romero a vote of confidence as his contract was rolled over for another year.

    Outgoing President Patrick Romero was the lone dissenter, but said in his opening remarks, “I like you.” He said the reason for his no vote was that he didn’t like the idea of rollover contracts.

  • City deals with code violator

    On Wednesday night, Las Vegas resident Tony Ortega was called a “one-man wrecking crew for the image of Las Vegas.” And it was suggested that the city pursue criminal charges against Ortega.

    Last year, the city entered agreements with Ortega to clean up his properties in the Railroad Avenue area or the city would take care of the problems itself.

  • COLUMN: It's all about jobs

    Last week, members of the Luna Community College Board of Trustees expressed their displeasure with the decline in student enrollment, which plunged 7.3 percent within a year’s time.

    But if you look at the last few years, the number has been going up and down.

    When the number drops, that means less dollars from the state. Northeastern New Mexico is lightly populated, so there will come a point where we shouldn’t expect Luna’s numbers to rise anymore.

  • Judge asked to move case out of town

    A defense attorney wants to move the case involving the killing of a 6-year-old girl out of town because of emotional media coverage.

    Last September, David Levi Chavez, 21, was charged with an open count of murder in connection with the death of Jasmine Garcia, who had just graduated from kindergarten.

    Garcia was sleeping in her mother’s bed at 304 Union St. late on June 15, when a shot ripped through an outside wall facing the street, killing her. Authorities say that Chavez was aiming for Garcia’s uncle when he fired at the house.

  • Some question Cinder project

    San Miguel County officials want to add a 1.6-mile path for bicyclists and pedestrians along Cinder Road as part of a long-term plan to extend the city’s riverwalk.

    But some residents in the Cinder Road area have concerns about the proposed project.

    For the last few years, the county has been planning the path, which it hopes will extend all the way to Montezuma. The county’s portion would start 700 feet north of Mills, which is where the county’s unincorporated area begins.