Today's News

  • Illinois backlog adds to problems

    Editor’s Note: This story is the latest installment in a joint initiative by The Associated Press and Associated Press Managing Editors on the fiscal crisis facing U.S. states and cities, how state and local governments are dealing with severe budget cuts, and how American lives will change because of it.

  • Mora County Notebook: Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

    Americans observe Hispanic Heritage Month each year from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15. It is a tribute to the generations of Hispanic Americans who have positively influenced and enriched America and their society.

    The theme for this year is: “Many backgrounds, many stories, one American Spirit.” As I read the material in the internet many people who have influenced the history of the United States were shown. There have been congressmen, artists, lawyers, musicians, doctors, professors, writers, teachers, athletes, business folks, and many more.  

  • Mora Community Calendar and Lunch Menu - Oct. 14, 2011

    Community Calendar

    5:30 p.m. — Mora Rangerette volleyball vs. Peñasco, junior varsity and varsity
    9 a.m. — Mora cross country at Rio Rancho, junior varsity and varsity, boys and girls                                       

  • Powell moving ahead with tire pile lawsuit

    By Karin Stangl
    State Land Office

    WAGON MOUND – State Land Commissioner Ray Powell will press ahead with a lawsuit against state land lessees who dumped a massive pile of tires outside the village of Wagon Mound on state trust land.

  • Palabras Pintorescas: A very hard lesson for brother Bill

    I found the new Ken Burns TV special programs on prohibition interesting, mainly because I had no idea what an impact (good or bad) drinking the various spirits had on our society. My sweet brother Bill, a reformed alcoholic, always said that if we could channel the brilliant minds who spent their lifetimes hiding that bottle of booze into progressive thinking, this world would tilt on its axis, all for the good.

  • Highlands enrollment up slightly

    Enrollment at New Mexico Highlands University is up slightly from last year, continuing the trend of modest growth it has enjoyed since at least 2009.

    Census day enrollment figures released by the university Monday reveal that overall enrollment this fall is at 3,792 — 33 more students than enrolled in Fall 2010. The figure includes enrollment on the main campus, and at Highlands centers and programs around the state.

    Likewise, overall student credit hours are up.

  • Jail worker is under investigation

    The San Miguel County Detention Center is wrapping up an investigation into allegations that one of its female employees was having an inappropriate relationship with an inmate, county officials have confirmed.

    The allegations are being made by the wife of that inmate, who was jailed for three months on domestic violence charges. The man was jailed on June 10 and released on Sept. 14 after entering a plea agreement with prosecutors.

  • Limited Storage

    Editor’s note: Today, the Optic continues its series on the city’s water problems with a look at the limited storage the city has available. The series will run each Wednesday through Nov. 2.

    Hot temperatures coupled with little to no rain had the entire city worried about running out of drinking water this past summer.

  • Gov. signs capital outlay package

    The Associated Press

    SANTA FE — Gov. Susana Martinez has signed into law a measure financing about $86 million worth of capital improvements, ranging from prison upgrades to vehicles for senior citizen centers.

    The capital outlay bill, which contains $7.3 million for improvements at the New Mexico Behaviorial Health Institute in Las Vegas, was approved by the Legislature during a special session that ended last month.

  • Authorities search for admitted killer’s victims

    By Russell Contreras
    The Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE — Police have reopened the unsolved case of an Albuquerque woman missing for 16 years after authorities received new information connected to a man who boasted in writings that he was responsible for around 40 victims.

    Albuquerque police were set to join FBI agents and New Mexico State Police on Tuesday in a search around Elephant Butte Reservoir and nearby caves where they believe David Parker Ray may have buried some of his claimed victims.