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Today's News

  • EDITORIAL: City acted superbly

    The City Council’s approval last week of new rules for movie projects was an example of city government at its finest. All of the contributors to the final product deserve credit: the mayor and council; the advisory Film Commission; Community Development Director Elmer Martinez and his staff; City Manager Timothy Dodge; and the public at large, which provided valuable input.

  • Music for the soul

    If you happen to be a music fanatic like I am,  you probably have noticed that there are many different genres of music, ranging from soul and blues to the darkest and heaviest heavy metal. I like many different kinds of music but I draw the line at pop. (I have an exception for Pop because there are only a few singers that I like.)

    I am a huge fan of rock. It can be the oldies but goodies or the new rock that is coming out. Every band that is out there sounds different and the music is real.

  • EDITORIAL: Bad form

    During public meetings, our elected officials should handle themselves with a certain level of decorum. Last week, Las Vegas City Schools board Chairman Phillip Vigil fell short of that standard.

  • Road salt harmful to plants and animals

    ‘Carthago delenda est!” cried Cato the Elder, “Carthage must be destroyed!”

    And so the Romans did, reportedly by leveling the city, selling its surviving citizens into slavery, and then sowing the land with salt.

    The Spanish adopted a similar practice. When a landowner was convicted of treason, salt was poured upon their lands, spelling death not only for the resident plants, but also humans, and any animals, birds and insects that depended on those lands for their habitat.

  • AS IT IS: Political intrigue

    In the last edition of Luna Community College’s newsletter, the college’s controller, Terri Mares, was asked about what she liked most and least about working at the school.

    She said she liked the people, her job and the college’s mission.

    As for what she liked least, she responded, “The politics and personal agendas that get in the way of us fulfilling the mission of the college; they may prevent us from becoming one of the greatest places to receive an education in the state, and perhaps, the nation.”

  • Officials say no to truck rules

    The state Environment Department apparently wants counties to address the issue of idling trucks.

    San Miguel County’s response: No thanks.

    The County Commission was told last week that the county was asked to develop regulations and guidance for electrification equipment at truck stops, so trucks don’t have to idle for long periods, which is believed to contribute to global warming.

    But county officials feared that it would be burdensome for the county to have to enforce rules against the operators of idling trucks.

  • LETTER: Entitled to mistakes?

    The Las Vegas Police Department’s chief has, appropriately, given the strongest argument possible for the establishment of a Civilian Review Board for the department. Indeed, the letter published in the same issue of the Optic arguing for such a board was not half as persuasive as to the need for such a civilian driven oversight mechanism. Not half as persuasive, I tell you. Listen to the highest-ranked law enforcement officer, Chief Gold: “Police officers work long hours and they are rarely appreciated.

  • Suspect’s bond is reduced

    The bond for a Las Vegas woman accused of killing a man has been reduced from $1 million to $100,000.

    District Judge Abigail Aragon decided to reduce the bond during a hearing last week, requiring that Bernadette Sanchez, 36, post 10 percent of the bond, or $10,000, to the court.

    Sanchez is charged in the stabbing death of Timoteo M. Jaramillo.

  • Hopeful vows not to hike taxes

    It’s a year until the 2010 Democratic and Republican primaries in New Mexico, but GOP gubernatorial candidate Allen Weh is already campaigning around the state.

    He visited Las Vegas recently.

    In a telephone interview, Weh, an ex-Marine, promised that he wouldn’t raise taxes if he were elected.

    “There’s enough waste and abuse in the state budget,” Weh said. “There is no reason why any man or woman would go forth to taxpayers and say, ‘We need to raise money without cleaning the mess inside government.’”

  • EDITORIAL: The benefits of firsts

    With the election of Barack Obama as president, the United States has taken a big step toward becoming what some call a post-racial society. Of course we’re a long way from there yet, but we're closer.