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Today's News

  • Mil Gracias letter

    We, the West Las Vegas High School Class of 1960, thank the individuals who contributed to make our 50th-year reunion during the July 4 Fiestas such a success.

    We thank the Bank of Las Vegas, which sponsored our reunion float in the parade and donated flag fans to cool off the spectators in the parade route.

    Our thanks to Albert Goke, who provided the float frame and construction. Phil Leger loaned the group his flatbed trailer.

    Thanks to Judy Ramirez who fabricated a quilt with inlaid pictures of Class of 1960 members.

  • Sports Commentary: Coaches facing some hard questions

    What drives one to coach? What motivates one to put up with the low pay, long hours, sleepless nights and so on and so on that they want to stay and do something that once was considered an art form of respect?

  • Editorial: Keep track of service

    The Las Vegas City Council recently gave a new two-year contract to the community’s ambulance provider, Superior Ambulance.

    But the city, by its own admission, hasn’t closely monitored the company’s performance for such details as response times. One of the reasons, Fire Chief Phil Mares said, was that Superior apparently had problems getting data from the city’s police dispatchers.

  • Wagon Mound mayor: Utility situation 'disturbing'

    The village of Wagon Mound’s list of delinquent utilities accounts failed to include those of a number of city employees and others, the village’s mayor says.

    Mayor Arthur Arguello said in a statement that when he took over as mayor in March, he found a “disturbing situation” in which the utilities weren’t paying for themselves.

    As a result, he said the state had forced the village to transfer “substantial amounts” of money from its general fund to the utilities.

  • New-look district this year

    Hello (again), Taos. Goodbye, St. Michael’s, Pojoaque Valley or Santa Fe Indian School.

    District 2-3A, in which Robertson and West Las Vegas compete, has undergone a major change in the offseason as part of a statewide realignment by the New Mexico Activities Association, the governing body overseeing high school athletics and other extracurricular activities in the state.

  • Highlands expects more budget cuts

    Highlands University officials say they are facing the same budgetary struggles as other state agencies. But they say they’ve been working on ways to deal with the situation.

    Highlands University President Jim Fries said the school is expecting a 3.2 percent cut, which is the level that state officials have been warning.

    Fries said the reduction of state money would begin in September. He read a memo from state officials that said if future budgetary forecasts improve, budgets could be adjusted upward. The memo also said budgets could be reduced.

  • Work of Art: Why the hand inspection?

    “May I see your hands, please?” Good grief! Is she coming on to me? I thought.

     Instead, she rubbed what looked like a small, damp orange Wet One across my palms. “Now turn around.”

    I did so, my anxiety increasing. “I meant ‘turn your hands around.’” I did that too. So the backs and the palms got swabbed, but what for? We’ll get into that later.

  • EDC director plans to leave

    The executive director of Las Vegas’ main economic development group is planning to step down, but he’s not sure when that’ll happen.

    Roberto Rios, director of the Las Vegas-San Miguel Economic Development Corporation, confirmed to the City Council recently that because of personal issues, he would have to leave his position. He has held the job for 13 months.

    He said that given the bad state of the economy, he said it may take some time to find another job, so he may still be at EDC for a while.

  • Editorial: Begin a new naming process

    No university has to name its buildings after people, but it’s been a long tradition to do so.

    Indeed, students and others often know the names of buildings, but they rarely know about the people they’re named after. So the names have very little impact.  

  • College seeking six radio stations

    Almost three years ago, Highlands University applied for six low-powered FM radio stations. One of those would include a station for the university’s foundation.

    President Jim Fries said recently that the foundation’s radio station would be in Romeroville, southwest of Las Vegas. The university currently operates KDEP-FM, which is across the street from Ilfeld Auditorium.

    “The Federal Communications Commission has granted Highlands licenses for the communities of Raton, Clayton, Farmington and possibly Milan,” Fries said.