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Today's News

  • Hispanics played key role in election

    By Jeri Clausing
    The Associated Press

    After years of flip-flopping between parties, New Mexico voters lined up solidly for a second time behind the Democratic Party in this week’s elections, a trend one analyst attributed to the state’s already large and fast-growing Hispanic population.

  • GOP gains in Senate, loses ground in House

    By Barry Massey
    The Associated Press

    New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez and her Republican allies lost ground in the state House of Representatives in the general election but gained seats in the Senate, including ousting a pair of Democratic leaders.

    The GOP waged a fierce legislative campaign battle in hopes of knocking off enough Democrats to take control of the House for the first time in nearly 60 years, but unofficial returns suggested the party went the other direction and lost seats.

  • Jail Log - Nov. 9, 2012

    The following individuals were booked into the San Miguel County Detention Center between Oct. 30 and Nov. 6:

  • Voters approve PRC revamp, approve bonds

    By Susan Montoya Bryan
    The Associated Press

    One of New Mexico’s most powerful, highest paid and scandal-plagued commissions will have a little less power now that voters have approved a set of constitutional amendments aimed at reforming the Public Regulation Commission.

    An amendment allowing the state Legislature to set minimum qualifications for PRC candidates was approved by an overwhelming majority late Tuesday.

  • Isleta Pueblo, Hard Rock part ways

    The Associated Press

    ISLETA PUEBLO — The Hard Rock name and an American Indian pueblo south of Albuquerque are parting ways.

    A resort executive for the Orlando, Fla.-based company announced Wednesday that Isleta Pueblo officials have decided to drop its affiliation with the Hard Rock brand at its casino and resort.

    The casino has operated under the name Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Albuquerque for three years and the pueblo has spent millions for the right to use the name.

  • Board rejects petition on PTSD medical pot

    The Associated Press

    SANTA FE — A petition aimed at removing post-traumatic stress disorder as a qualifier for medical marijuana in New Mexico has been rejected.

    The New Mexico Medical Cannabis Advisory Board unanimously ruled Wednesday to reject the petition by an Albuquerque psychiatrist who said there was a lack of scientific evidence proving medical marijuana helped those with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    The board voted 7-0 to recommend that interim Health Secretary Brad McGrath reject the petition despite the claims.

  • Looking Back - Nov. 9, 2012

    In 1962

    Tuesday, Nov. 6 — Dr. Isaac Terr, who headed the SOS drive in San Miguel County, reported that it appeared that most of the people who took Type I oral polio vaccine returned for Type II, and that a fair number who missed the first dose took the second. Over half of the residents of the community took the vaccine. “This is less than the percentage hoped for, but still gratifying, as a start,” Dr. Terr said.

  • Looking Ahead - News - Nov. 9, 2012

    Veterans Day breakfast to be held Sunday

    The Las Vegas Elks Lodge #408 is hosting a Veterans Day breakfast from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. this Sunday at the lodge located at 2305 Collins Drive. All veterans and their families are invited.
     

  • Weather - Nov. 9, 2012

    Friday
    Mostly sunny, with a high near 66. Windy, with a west wind 20-30 mph, with gusts as high as 40 mph. Isolated showers at night. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 36. Windy, with a southwest wind 25-30 mph, with gusts as high as 40 mph. Chance of precipitation is 10 percent.

    Saturday
    A slight chance of rain showers. Areas of blowing dust before 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 56. Windy, with a southwest wind 30-35 mph, with gusts as high as 50 mph. Chance of precipitation is 10 percent.

    Sunday

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 9, 2012

    THUMBS UP! FINALLY, IT’S OVER. In what goes down in history as the most expensive election in American history (at least until 2016), we breathe a sigh of relief that it’s finally over. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, the total cost of the presidential and congressional campaigns jumped up 7 percent to nearly $5.8 billion, with about $2.5 billion going solely into the presidential campaign. One big reason for the increases: the superPACs.
    Not surprisingly, the previous record for campaign spending was in, you guessed it, 2008.