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Today's News

  • Process to a decision

    Last week, after about two years of haggling over the issue, the San Miguel County Commission voted to approve a wind energy ordinance that includes the highly controversial decision to establish a half-mile setback for wind turbines. That means that these massive turbines can be constructed within a half mile, but no closer, to residential and other properties.

  • Publisher's Note: Why the population drop?

    We’re in God’s country. Beautiful land, good people, rich in culture and diversity, with a live-and-let-live approach to getting along.

    So why are more people leaving than coming in?

    Recently released U.S. Census data show that Las Vegas and San Miguel County had a net loss of people last decade. The city lost 812 and the county 733. Las Vegas lost 5.6 percent of its population while San Miguel County took a 2.5 percent hit.

  • Hoops all-star teams named

    As expected, given the successes of the past season, the Meadow City dominated All-District 2-3A basketball honors for 2010-11.

    All-district lineups were announced late last week and include 13 local hoopsters — six boys and seven girls.

  • Looking ahead

    MONDAY
    Baseball
    • West Las Vegas vs. Española, 4 p.m., Española

    Golf
    • Robertson hosts RHS Invite, 10 a..m., Gene Torres Golf Course

    TUESDAY
    Baseball
    • NMHU vs. Eastern New Mexico, 2 p.m., Brandt Park

    Softball
    • NMHU vs. Eastern New Mexico (DH), 1 p.m., Cowgirl Field
    • Robertson at Española, 3 p.m., Española

  • FYI

    In conjunction with Gary Shaw and Mirabal Boxing,Crespin’s Boxing Promotions and Santa Ana Star Casino are holding a professional boxing event on Saturday, April 2, at the Santa Ana Star Casino. Eight fights, featuring Archie Ray Marquez, Arturo Crespin and Amanda Crespin, as well as Michael Coca Gallegos and others, are scheduled. Doors open at 6 p.m.; first bell is at 7. Tickets are $12.50, $22.50, $32.50, $42.50 and $52.50 and available from Carlos Crespin, 429-4068, and via the casino box office and Web site.

  • Weekend Roundup

    Justin Kaid’s two-run double in the top of the 10th inning  lifted NMHU baseball to victory in an 18-17 thriller against Colorado Christian Saturday in Lakewood, Colo.

    With an 11-2 win Friday and a 6-5 nod in Saturday’s game one, the Cowboys took a 3-0 series lead and improved to 11-8 overall and 6-5 in league.

    In Friday’s game one, Trent Evins (2-3) held the Cougars to two runs on four hits with five strikeouts in eight innings. A.J. Alexander hit 3 of 5, scored thrice and had two RBI.

  • Four accused Quintana in ‘06

    Years before Robertson High School officials were put on notice that Jay Quintana allegedly had a long-term sexual relationship with one of his students, they received complaints from three other female students that he had touched them inappropriately and a complaint from another that he had made a sexually suggestive remark to her in class.

  • Spring Fever
  • County adopts wind ordinance

    San Miguel County commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a wind energy ordinance governing the development of wind farms in the county despite concerns that such projects would create noise pollution and hurt the quality of life for residents who live near them.

    Among the top criticisms of the ordinance was the half-mile setback, the requirement that wind turbines be at least half a mile away from any occupied house, commercial building, hospital, school or church. A county task force had previously recommended a three-mile setback.

  • Population down for city, county

    Where did they go?

    Las Vegas and San Miguel County have fewer residents than 10 years ago, according to 2010 census figures released this week by the U.S. Census Bureau.

    Mora County, Wagon Mound and Pecos also saw a drop in their populations.

    Indeed, many of New Mexico’s rural areas remained stagnant or lost population while the state’s urban areas like Rio Rancho grew  during that period.

    The state  actually grew by more than 240,000 people over the past decade, with more than 2 million people living here.