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Today's News

  • Publisher's Note: Great debates

    A couple of weeks ago I was asked to be a judge at a series of debates at West Las Vegas High School. What I experienced was both frustrating and inspiring.

    First, the frustration. I found it difficult to sit there without speaking up about the issues under debate. The questions posed were relevant and timely and the wannabe teacher in me wanted to jump into the fray. But I maintained my role and kept quiet — not such an easy thing to do for an inky pundit like me.

  • Fifth-graders honor late coaches

    This year’s Las Vegas City Schools fifth-grade basketball championship tournaments had a little more meaning than usual for participants, spectators and the school district.

  • Commentary: Pound for pound, Gillie was a great one

    Editor’s note: This is the seventh of a series of articles written on old-school athletics by Luna Community College sports performance instructor Henry Sanchez.

    By Henry Sanchez
    Luna Community College

    Gilbert “Gillie” Lopez was born on Jan. 11, 1922, and passed away on May 18, 2005. In the 83 years he lived on this earth, he left a mark that his family can be proud of. We will attempt to look at his life and recall some of the things that made the man.

  • ‘Our greatest loss’

    Rita Romero dropped off her husband, Frank, at work Wednesday morning, their regular routine since high gas prices convinced them it was time to start carpooling.

    “I kissed him goodbye, said I love you, I’ll see you at 4 o’clock,” Rita Romero said, her voice cracking with emotion. “That was it.”

  • Union: Accident was preventable

    A state union official says the Wednesday accident that left two men dead didn’t have to happen.

    “The problem for us is that had (the city) followed half of the stuff they were supposed to do, these guys ... would be alive right now,” said Joel Villareal, staff representative with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 18 in Albuquerque.

  • Romero loved to laugh

    By Martín Salazar
    Las Vegas Optic

    Frank and Rita Romero moved to Las Vegas from California four years ago looking for a fresh start.

    “After our son passed away, we just decided to have a new life and start over,” Rita Romero said.

    On Wednesday their fresh start turned tragic. Frank Romero, 49, and another city worker were inside an 8- or 9-foot trench when it collapsed, killing both of them.

    “It’s a huge loss, but hopefully my son was there to greet him,” Rita Romero said.

  • Hern a father of three

    Gene Hern, one of two city of Las Vegas utilities workers who died Wednesday when a ditch collapsed and buried them, was a father of three.

    The 32-year-old had worked for the city for about four years, city officials said. When he wasn’t working at the city he was often working at El Rialto Restaurant, a job he held for years.

    His aunt, Grace Roybal, said Gene Hern was a hard worker and had two sons and a daughter all under the age of 15.

  • East board rejects finalists

    Even before the crucial motion was made on Tuesday, it was clear that the four finalists vying to be the next superintendent of the Las Vegas City Schools wouldn’t be settling in at central office anytime soon.

    Board members Gabriel Lucero and Elaine Luna tried twice to get the board to hire a finalist, first Lucero, motioning to hire Eric Martinez then Luna making a motion to hire Sheri Williams.

    Their efforts were in vain.

  • LV man charged with kidnapping

    A 22-year-old Las Vegas man was arrested this week after he allegedly broke into his girlfriend's Tecolote home, beat and choked her and then dragged her by the hair and forced her into his car.

    Steven Archuleta, of the 900 block of East Prince, faces multiple charges, including kidnapping, a second-degree felony, aggravated battery against a household member, a third-degree felony and burglary, also a third-degree felony. He was booked into the San Miguel County Detention Center, and his bond was set at $25,000 cash.

  • Acequia Culture

    The “acequia culture” is a widely recognized part of life in rural New Mexico, dating back to the pre-colonial area.

    Irrigation systems required extensive and long-term planning, construction and maintenance, the key being the cooperation among parciantes (the people who participate in a ditch system). In a sense, such organization constituted a government of the people, and its descendants into the 21st century continue the ancient tradition.