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Today's News

  • Full scholarships to UWC for two Las Vegas students

    Two Las Vegas high school students have received full scholarships to attend a United World College this fall.

    Taran Franklyn-Atman, a junior at West Las Vegas High School, will attend UWC Mahindra College in India. The 16-year-old is the son of Elsu Atman and Danielle Franklyn.

    Deandre Gutierrez, a sophomore at Robertson High School, will attend Pearson College UWC in British Columbia, Canada. Deandre, 15, is the son of Regina and Orlando Gutierrez.

  • A trade war will hurt San Miguel County

    In any kind of all-out military war, the U.S. can probably beat anyone on earth. In a trade war, however, the U.S. doesn’t hold such a strong advantage.

    San Miguel and Mora counties, and New Mexico in general, will be long-term losers if the apparently forming trade war with China and other nations continues to materialize.

  • Consider poverty from multiple points of view

    Some insisted during the recent Tri-County Poverty Summit, spearheaded by San Miguel County Commissioner Rock Ulibarri, that the problem is structural.

    If true, how is the structure defined?

    The other logical question, of course, is who imagined and saw to its being built?

    If one can’t honestly define the structural problem, how can one clearly take the necessary action to address or fix the problem?

    One significant point was made that emphasized perspective.

  • Oh, the joys of aging!

    Recently, Vicki Howell asked me, “How do you like being retired here in Las Vegas?”  I explained to her that I dislike both the word and the concept. “Retired” sounds like I’m tired, over and over again. I’m not doing anything again. I’ve never been retired.

    Although I’m not working full-time anymore, I am teaching at Luna, writing a column for The Optic, and singing with Contrafact Jazz Band.

  • Adjust your sails to add value to others

    No one has ever attained greatness in a job they hate.

    There, I said it.

    Let me take this a step further. No one has ever been good at parenting who has hated being a parent. So much of what we do in this world is controlled by our core attitudes and beliefs. From our core comes our actions.

    This concept on greatness is quite simple. If you don’t have your heart into what you do, you will not excel at what you are doing.

  • Editorial cartoon, Sunday, April 8, 2018

    Editorial cartoon, Sunday, April 8, 2018.

  • Cancion del Mariachi: Isotopes adopt alter ego

    As part of an effort throughout affiliated minor-league baseball to recognize the heritage of its Hispanic fan base, the Albuquerque Isotopes have adopted the Mariachis de Nuevo Mejico as their alter ego.

    The Isotopes will don the alternate Mariachis uniforms for four home games this season: Saturday, May 5; Tuesday, June 26; Friday, July 20; and Sunday, Aug. 19. The organization plans to have mariachi-themed promotions on those dates, with the possibility of actual mariachi groups performing at The Lab.

  • Batter up! Isotopes focus on individual improvement

    Whether it’s helping Albuquerque win baseball games or helping themselves reach the promised land of Major League Baseball, Isotopes players seem to be in agreement on what’s most important in those quests.

    “Consistency is the key,” said Austin House, a relief pitcher who is an alumnus of both Albuquerque’s La Cueva High and the University of New Mexico. “Going about your business every day like a professional. You’ve got to be a consistent player.”

  • Looking Ahead: Sports, April 8-10

    SUNDAY (April 8)
    Baseball

    • Albuquerque Isotopes at Salt Lake Bees, 1:05 p.m., Salt Lake City
    • NMHU at CSU-Pueblo, noon, Pueblo, Colo.
    Soccer
    • Las Vegas Youth Soccer League games, 1:30 and 3 p.m., UWC campus, Montezuma
    Softball
    • NMHU at Fort Lewis (DH), 11 a.m., Durango, Colo.

    MONDAY
    Baseball

    • Albuquerque Isotopes at Salt Lake Bees, 12:05 p.m., Salt Lake City

  • Middle ground

    All is in ready mode — thriving, growing and vibrant — in the 60-foot greenhouse located since 2005 at the closed Memorial Middle School building.

    There are rows of strawberry and raspberry plants; amaryllis and pink and red geraniums show off their bold colors among the sea of green. The green cabbage thrusts its big leaves out from its pot, and grafted apples await transplanting. Even the worms in the three big bins continue munching biodegradable material into nutrient-rich fertilizer.