Today's News

  • State volleyball quests end for area teams

    RIO RANCHO -- Las Vegas-area volleyball teams battled their way to the Final Four in their respective classifications before falling on Friday night. 

    Seeded 10th to start the Class 4A tournament, Robertson emerged as the Cinderella of the weekend. After stunning higher-ranked Wingate and Portales to win their pool Thursday, the Lady Cardinals earned a first-round bye. Then on Friday, they took down district rival Pojoaque Valley in four sets. It was the third win in four meetings with the Elkettes this fall. 

  • Update: Robertson advances; West falls to Sandia Prep

    Robertson beat Pojoaque 3-1 to advane to tonight's Class 4A semifinals.

    West Las Vegas lost 3-0 to top-ranked Sandia Prep and is eliminated.

  • Rescuers honored

    A woman is alive today due to the swift action of Villanueva State Park employees Ramon Gallegos and Gilbert Baca.

    They both received Life Saving awards earlier this month for what they did to save the woman, who had fallen into the Pecos River. They, and several other New Mexico State Parks Division employees were honored at a ceremony in Santa Fe on Nov. 4. During that ceremony, 21 awards were handed out and five retirees from the division were honored for their service.

  • Mayor not seeking re-election

    He’s been telling people privately for months that he’s not running, but on Thursday Mayor Alfonso Ortiz Jr. took it a step further, declaring during the City Council meeting that he will not be seeking a third term.

    “I am not running for re-election,” Ortiz said, disputing a recent report in an online publication that he planned to toss his hat into the ring for another term.

    “I’ve enjoyed every moment to this day of being in office,” Ortiz said. “I’ve done the best I could.”

  • Expect lower gas bills

    If you’re a city of Las Vegas natural gas customer, you’ll get to keep a few extra bucks in your pocket this winter.

    City Utilities Director Ken Garcia notified the City Council on Thursday that Zia Natural Gas Company — the city’s supplier — has reduced its rates by 14 percent, and the city will be passing that savings on to its customers.

    City natural gas customers will see the lower rates reflected in the bills being mailed out this month.

  • Beth Speaks for Herself - Planning for senior living center under way

    “I don’t want to be a burden.”

    Have you heard that sad sentence whispered by your father or mother or perhaps a favorite aunt? My dad never asked that question because he died at age 55 of a massive heart attack. God rest his soul. As my mother advanced in years, she told my brother and me, “I do not want to be a burden.” How could she be? Not only had she given us life, she had doted on us. We moved all over the USA, and wherever we settled, she was our room mother or our Cub Scout leader.

  • Revitalizing Gallinas River Park supporters seek public input

    Submitted to the Optic

    The public is invited to a Revitalizing Gallinas River Park Public Input Forum hosted by the Hermit’s Peak Watershed Alliance and Las Vegas-San Miguel Economic Development Corp. The forum will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Thursday in the Governance Room at the Highlands University Student Center.

    The RGP Collaborative has presented to the City Council and will be presenting to the county Commission, to give a broad-spectrum picture of the project.

  • Nun set to move up sainthood path

    By Russell Contreras
    The Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE — An Italian-born nun who challenged Billy the Kid, calmed angry mobs and helped open New Mexico territory hospitals and schools is set to move up the path toward possible sainthood.

    The Archdiocese of Santa Fe was scheduled Friday to close its inquiry on why Sister Blandina Segale should become a saint. The inquiry panel will then forward its findings to the Vatican.

  • Nakamura appointed to fill Supreme Court seat

    By Mary Hudetz
    The Associated Press

    Gov. Susana Martinez selected District Court Judge Judith Nakamura on Thursday to fill a seat on the New Mexico Supreme Court, calling her an advocate for public safety who has shown “tremendous leadership” in the state’s court system.

  • Ethics reform needed

    Given the scandals that have rocked New Mexico over the past year, it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that our state scored a D- in the 2015 State Integrity Investigation.

    The investigation — conducted by the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit, nonpartisan investigative news organization in Washington, D.C. — assessed how each state’s laws and practices deter corruption, promote transparency and enforce accountability.