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Today's News

  • Confessions of a Hispanic woman

    In 2006, Patricia Crespín’s first play, “We Are Hispanic American Women ... Okay!” opened in Las Vegas, New Mexico.  In November 2008, her career as a playwright comes full circle when “Confessions of a Hispanic American Woman” premiers in Las Vegas, as well.

  • Ouch! Us, too...

    Now, the economy just doesn’t affect the adults, it affects the younger crowd too.

    With the crazy gas prices (which are actually getting better) and the money that has to go toward school, I would have never guessed that this would effect me the way it has.

    Now that I have a car and drive myself everywhere, I’ve noticed that most of my money has gone straight toward gas, and I have to say my car is not the most efficient on gas. It’s good, but it has a big tank so when I go to fill it up it takes about 30 dollars or more.

  • The Harvey Girls at Montezuma's Castle

    “The Harvey Girls” will be the theme for the 2008 Las Vegas Citizens’ Committee for Historic Preservation Annual Preservation Awards Dinner, which will be held at the former Harvey House Hotel, the Montezuma Castle at the United World College of the American West.  

  • Don't high-five the bailout

    The first time I felt the impact of big bucks was in my youth, while window shopping at the old J.C. Penney store in Las Vegas, exactly where Beall’s operates now.

    I had been selling newspapers downtown and ran in to a fifth-grade classmate who I thought to be the richest kid in town. We began talking about finances. I’d been proud of having opened my own passbook-savings account, at the First National Bank, and, solely through sales of Optics, I’d built up a nest egg of about $7.

  • Agenda for Las Vegas City Council meeting

    • The Las Vegas City Council will meet at 6 p.m. today in the council’s chambers in City Hall, 1700 N. Grand Ave.

    Presentations

    • Tree board presenting the Tree City USA Award

    • Louie Loera on recommendations of the Plaza Task Force.

    • Arturo Mondragon and Susanna Gonzales from the Parks and Recreation Task Force.

    City manager’s informational report

    • Status of Legion Drive project.

    • Status of Lee Drive roundabout.

    • Status of Tony Ortega properties.

  • Officials: Dorms on schedule

    The construction of new dorms at Highlands University is on schedule, officials said last week.

    “It’ll really be a step up for student life,” said Bill Taylor, the school’s vice president of finance. “The dorms are moving along nicely.”

    Marisol Greene, the university’s director of facilities and planning, said the contractor, Franken Construction, has finished much of the outside work and is now focusing on the inside.

    “We are on target,” she said.

  • COLUMN: Volunteering victims? No way

    The people accused of assaulting others during a Robertson High School football camp in August are innocent until proven guilty. That’s as it should be.

    The allegations, of course, are highly disturbing. The one excuse we’re hearing over and over holds no water whatsoever.

  • Mayor goes over HUD official’s head

    Mayor Tony Marquez is going over the head of a top federal housing official in New Mexico because of the official’s alleged vendetta against Las Vegas.

    Marquez has invited Justin Ormsby from the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department regional office in Fort Worth, Texas, to meet with the Las Vegas City Council.

    The mayor also informed federal elected officials about the Las Vegas Optic story of the alleged vendetta against the city by HUD official Floyd Duran, according to a city press release.

  • Residents: Don’t pave our road

    Many rural residents want their roads paved, but those living on a forest road near Pecos apparently don’t.

    The U.S. Forest Service had asked San Miguel County to accept Forest Road 223 as a county road. But a county road-viewing committee recommended against doing so, saying that the agency needed to obtain the proper easements from landowners and settle all issues involving the road.

  • The right call

    Recently, the Las Vegas Police Department closed its rifle range to the public. That’s after officers discovered yet another rash of damage to the facility, including vandalism, illegal dumping and shooting at structures not intended as targets.

    The police made the right decision. Now, officers are drafting a new policy for use of the range, and they say they hope to involve the public.