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Local News

  • Storrie Project also left out of loop

    Members of the Las Vegas City Council apparently weren’t the only key players left out of the loop when the city administration quietly tried to change the intent of more than $1 million for a water project.

    Robert Quintana, president of the Storrie Project Water Users Association, said Monday that no one informed his group about the change either — and the association was very much involved in the issue.

  • HU students go to Mexico

    Social work students at Highlands University went to Mexico recently to improve their bilingual skills.

    Thirteen students from Highlands University’s one-of-a-kind Social Work Bilingual-Bicultural Master’s Program completed a successful exchange with the University of Chihuahua School of Social Work in Mexico this fall.

  • No more trips for students

    Eighth-graders at Memorial Middle School shouldn’t be expecting any more field trips this school year.

    School officials said that became the case after they caught a number of students drinking on a field trip last week to Albuquerque, where they visited a museum and saw the movie, “Twilight.”

    Rick Romero, superintendent of the Las Vegas City Schools, said eight students were seen by teachers pouring hard liquor into containers with Coca-Cola on the bus ride home.

  • Charges against Romero tossed out

    Prosecutors have dropped charges against former City Councilman Eugene Romero in connection with an argument he had with a woman at his house.

    Romero, 40, 300 Cumbres Patio, had been charged with false imprisonment, a fourth-degree felony, and criminal damage to property, a misdemeanor.

    In October, Las Vegas police were called to Romero’s house. According to court documents, the woman told officers that the former councilman didn’t want her to leave the house. Romero himself admitted to standing in the doorway, preventing her from leaving, police said.

  • Many like Union school as it is

    Union Elementary is a small neighborhood school. The students’ test scores are high. And the parents would like to keep things as they are.

    And so would Jim Abreu, superintendent of the West Las Vegas schools.

    A few years ago, the district developed a long-term plan in which the four classrooms at Union would move to Tony Serna Elementary and Family Partnership would then occupy Union.

    A couple of years ago, Union parents objected vehemently to the plan. But the district officially stuck to it.

  • District rejects low bid for bleachers

    An out-of-state company was the low bidder for a contract for new bleachers at West Las Vegas High School’s gym, and the district had already awarded the contract.

    Last week, however, the school board rescinded the low bid from the New York company because the firm came in with a change order right away to replace motors that open and close the bleachers at an added cost of $27,000, official said.

  • City names new housing director

    Five months ago, the city let go six of its directors. Now one of those positions is filled.

    Last week, the City Council approved the hiring of Robert Pacheco as housing director. He previously served as the director of the Tucumcari housing authority for 14 years.

    Pacheco, who is coming out of retirement, told the council that the Tucumcari authority increased its annual budget from $200,000 to $1.2 million on his watch.

  • Officers involved in fire, murder case honored

    The community was in fear earlier this year after a 6-year-old girl was shot while sleeping, but detectives worked hard to apprehend the suspect, an official said.

    As such, Police Chief Gary Gold recognized his department’s four detectives during a City Council meeting last week.

    He also honored those officers who helped with the effort to evacuate people from two homes engulfed in flames a few weeks ago on Douglas Avenue.

    In his memo to the detectives, Gold wrote that the killing of Jasmine Garcia in her bed was “no ordinary crime.”

  • Woman helps fire victims

    With tears streaming down her face, Patricia Navarro recalled going to a friend’s aid after a fire destroyed her apartment and left her on the street to fend for herself.

    With an ironic twist of fate, several weeks later Navarro came home with her mother, Marie Frausto, after a long day trying to replace her friend’s belongings, only to find fire trucks surrounding her own home.

    On the night of Nov. 1, an alleged arsonist torched a two-story home on Douglas Avenue, killing Connie Vigil.

  • Las Vegas won’t have lobbyist

    The city won’t have a lobbyist to promote Las Vegas issues at the state Legislature — at least for next year.

    At this week’s meeting, the City Council considered a proposal to include lobbyist duties for the position of grant writer.

    Councilman Morris Madrid said he opposed including lobbying among the grant writer’s duties. He said the skills required for lobbying were quite different from writing grant proposals.