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Local News

  • City asked to help with shelter

    A local group is asking the city for help to set up a permanent shelter for the homeless. Members of the City Council say they’re interested.

    Last winter, First Presbyterian Church made available temporary space for such a shelter. Volunteers worked in shifts, and paid staffers covered those times when no volunteers were signed up.

    From Nov. 23 to April 1, the shelter served 47 people, who used the facility for a total of 835 days. Most of the people in the shelter were chronically homeless Las Vegas residents, but some were traveling through town.

  • Conservation law changes pondered

    The city is looking at ways to change it conservation ordinance to further reduce water consumption.

    Last week, the City Council voted to publish its current ordinance and seek community input. The ordinance includes three stages of conservation, with each stage imposing stricter requirements.

    The ordinance also lists the penalties for violations, although city officials have said before that the community has shown great cooperation, so citations haven’t been required.

  • Mora group wants hearing

    A group concerned about possible oil and gas drilling in Mora County contends the public has yet to get its say with elected representatives.

    A year ago, the Mora County Commission had planned to hold a public hearing on the issue, but it canceled the meeting at the last minute. The nonprofit group, Drilling Mora County, carried on with the event, with more than 200 attending to listen to arguments about the drawbacks of energy development.

  • Judge asked to take DA off case

    Robertson High School’s former football coach, who is accused in connection with attacks during a team camp, is questioning the impartiality of the district attorney and a state police captain.

    The coach, Ray Woods, is charged with failure to report child abuse in connection with the attacks during the camp last August in the Gallinas Canyon.

  • Hail causes leaks at school

    Recent hailstorms have taken a toll on West Las Vegas Middle School.

    The storms, which occurred on the last two Wednesdays, caused leaks in the roof at the school, which means the West district will have to replace ceiling tiles, Superintendent Jim Abreu said this week.

    Several inches of hail fell on parts of Las Vegas, particularly in its central areas, in the first storm. The buildup of hail apparently plugged up drains on the middle school roof, which caused the leakage, Abreu said.

    “The roof was compromised because of the hail,” he said.

  • Same program, new funding source

    Federal stimulus money is being put to use in a number of areas in Las Vegas, including enabling kids on the west side of town to participate in summer activities that wouldn’t be available otherwise.

    This year, the district didn’t receive funding through the 21st Century Program.

    Director Elaine Martinez-Gonzales and Assistant Director Gary Luna say that even though the funding source has changed, the spirit of the program remains as it has since 2002.

  • Students take part in summer program

    Summertime fun is the theme for 280 kids from the Las Vegas City Schools participating in the 21st Century summer program.

    Program director Michell Aragon said every day children are engaged in a host of activities, including academics, activity enrichment and physical education. She said the roster filled up quickly and is open to kids entering the second grade.

    “We are pretty full. I know I disappointed a lot of the younger kids coming out of kindergarten because we just weren’t ready for them due to the academic part of the program,” Aragon said.

  • West district throws off taggers

    Taggers doing mischief at the renovations at Don Cecilio Martinez Elementary School found their graffiti washed away.

    That was due to the foresight of district architect Antonio Ortega. After completing work on a wall, Ortega ordered a special anti-graffiti spray, which construction workers applied.

  • City looks at erasing history

    No one is disputing what happened at the City Council’s Feb. 4 meeting: A split governing body fired then-Utilities Director George DuFour.

    It all happened during an open session, attended by dozens of residents.

    But the city administration apparently prefers not to officially remember the heated discussion before DuFour’s dismissal.

  • Luna worker not following court order

    More and more convicted drunken drivers are being required to get ignition interlocks as a way to make sure they drive sober.

    Drivers must blow into the alcohol-detecting devices, and if they are under the influence, their cars won’t start.

    But it’s not always easy to make sure people are using interlocks, as required by judges.