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Local News

  • Tubman’s replacing Jackson on the $20 a deeply symbolic move

    By Deepti Hajela and Errin Haines Whack

    The Associated Press

    NEW YORK — Growing up in Oklahoma, Becky Hobbs noticed some of her Cherokee elders wouldn’t even touch a $20 bill because they so despised Andrew Jackson. To this day, the 66-year-old songwriter pokes him in the face whenever she gets one.

    For Hobbs and many other Native Americans, the U.S. Treasury’s decision to replace Jackson’s portrait with Harriet Tubman’s is a hugely meaningful change.

  • Judge search continues in corruption case

    The Associated Press

    SANTA FE — Two semi-retired New Mexico state judges have been nominated to oversee a criminal fraud case against former Sen. Phil Griego after a string of judges in Santa Fe District Court declined to hear the case.

    State prosecutors and Griego’s attorney agreed to recommend substitute Judges James A. Hall of Santa Fe or Michael E. Martinez of Albuquerque. Defense attorney Tom Smith says they are both active as substitute judges.

  • Prince, Haggard, Bowie, White, Frey: Lousy year for music

    By David Bauder
    AP Entertainment Writer

    NEW YORK — It’s only April and already 2016 is a terrible year for music.

    That’s not to slight Kendrick Lamar, Sturgill Simpson, Beyonce or some unknown creator working in a basement to turn the sounds in their head into a file for everyone to hear and enjoy.

  • Prince, Haggard, Bowie, White, Frey: Lousy year for music

    By David Bauder
    AP Entertainment Writer

    NEW YORK — It’s only April and already 2016 is a terrible year for music.

    That’s not to slight Kendrick Lamar, Sturgill Simpson, Beyonce or some unknown creator working in a basement to turn the sounds in their head into a file for everyone to hear and enjoy.

  • In Brief - News - April 24, 2016

    The Associated Press

    State must pay ACLU $90K

    New Mexico has lost a long-running lawsuit over legal fees in a public records case.

    The New Mexican reports that state taxpayers will now be responsible for $90,000 in legal fees for the American Civil Liberties Union.

    The state Court of Appeals on Wednesday upheld a 2014 decision that the ACLU is entitled to more than $87,000 in legal fees from the Secretary of State’s Office, a number that doesn’t include the fees incurred by the appeals process.

  • DNA test ordered to prove man’s claim

    The Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE — A man who says he is the biological father of the late boxer Johnny Tapia will need a DNA test to prove it.

    A New Mexico judge ruled last week that Jerry Padilla must undergo a blood test to prove his claim after the fighter’s widow demanded it in a legal battle.

  • New Day at City Hall

    Newly elected Mayor Tonita Gurule-Giron wasted no time in assembling her team, appointing local businessman David A. Ulibarri Jr. as the new city councilor for the Ward 1 seat and naming a new city manager and a new city attorney on Tuesday — a week after winning the mayoral runoff.

  • AG weighs in on Alta Vista OB issue

    The early March closing of the obstetrics department at Alta Vista Regional Hospital has gotten the attention of New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas. On Wednesday Balderas, a native of Wagon Mound, sent a letter to the hospital’s CEO Chris Wolf expressing his concerns regarding the closing, calling it “an unacceptable gap in services for women across the northeastern part of the state, placing vulnerable New Mexicans at risk.”

  • Get advice on preserving family history

    Submitted to the Optic

    Donnelly Library and the City of Las Vegas Museum will host workshops April 24 through 30 on preserving family documents.

    The workshops are part of the American Library Association’s national Preservation Week

  • NM prepares to sue over wolves

    By Susan Montoya Bryan
    The Associated Press

    New Mexico is threatening legal action against the federal government after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service quietly revealed its intention to release more Mexican gray wolves into the wild.

    The state Department of Game and Fish confirmed Wednesday that its lawyers have filed a notice of intent to sue over the proposed releases.