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Local News

  • Charges against Romero tossed out

    Prosecutors have dropped charges against former City Councilman Eugene Romero in connection with an argument he had with a woman at his house.

    Romero, 40, 300 Cumbres Patio, had been charged with false imprisonment, a fourth-degree felony, and criminal damage to property, a misdemeanor.

    In October, Las Vegas police were called to Romero’s house. According to court documents, the woman told officers that the former councilman didn’t want her to leave the house. Romero himself admitted to standing in the doorway, preventing her from leaving, police said.

  • Many like Union school as it is

    Union Elementary is a small neighborhood school. The students’ test scores are high. And the parents would like to keep things as they are.

    And so would Jim Abreu, superintendent of the West Las Vegas schools.

    A few years ago, the district developed a long-term plan in which the four classrooms at Union would move to Tony Serna Elementary and Family Partnership would then occupy Union.

    A couple of years ago, Union parents objected vehemently to the plan. But the district officially stuck to it.

  • District rejects low bid for bleachers

    An out-of-state company was the low bidder for a contract for new bleachers at West Las Vegas High School’s gym, and the district had already awarded the contract.

    Last week, however, the school board rescinded the low bid from the New York company because the firm came in with a change order right away to replace motors that open and close the bleachers at an added cost of $27,000, official said.

  • City names new housing director

    Five months ago, the city let go six of its directors. Now one of those positions is filled.

    Last week, the City Council approved the hiring of Robert Pacheco as housing director. He previously served as the director of the Tucumcari housing authority for 14 years.

    Pacheco, who is coming out of retirement, told the council that the Tucumcari authority increased its annual budget from $200,000 to $1.2 million on his watch.

  • Officers involved in fire, murder case honored

    The community was in fear earlier this year after a 6-year-old girl was shot while sleeping, but detectives worked hard to apprehend the suspect, an official said.

    As such, Police Chief Gary Gold recognized his department’s four detectives during a City Council meeting last week.

    He also honored those officers who helped with the effort to evacuate people from two homes engulfed in flames a few weeks ago on Douglas Avenue.

    In his memo to the detectives, Gold wrote that the killing of Jasmine Garcia in her bed was “no ordinary crime.”

  • Woman helps fire victims

    With tears streaming down her face, Patricia Navarro recalled going to a friend’s aid after a fire destroyed her apartment and left her on the street to fend for herself.

    With an ironic twist of fate, several weeks later Navarro came home with her mother, Marie Frausto, after a long day trying to replace her friend’s belongings, only to find fire trucks surrounding her own home.

    On the night of Nov. 1, an alleged arsonist torched a two-story home on Douglas Avenue, killing Connie Vigil.

  • Las Vegas won’t have lobbyist

    The city won’t have a lobbyist to promote Las Vegas issues at the state Legislature — at least for next year.

    At this week’s meeting, the City Council considered a proposal to include lobbyist duties for the position of grant writer.

    Councilman Morris Madrid said he opposed including lobbying among the grant writer’s duties. He said the skills required for lobbying were quite different from writing grant proposals.

  • Suit wants player returned to school

    The parents of a Robertson High School football player accused of rape and kidnapping in a hazing incident and kicked out of school have sued the school district, contending he was not directly involved.

    The federal court lawsuit also says that in any case, the player was being punished for behavior that was implicitly endorsed by the coaching staff.

  • Student found with pellet guns

    West Las Vegas Middle School is punishing a student who brought two pellet guns to school this week, a top official said Thursday.

    Jim Abreu, superintendent of the West Las Vegas schools, said middle school authorities found out that the boy had brought the two weapons to school Tuesday. Officials had evidence from a security camera of the boy showing off the pellet guns to classmates.

  • Las Vegas may be at risk for hunger

    If national trends are an indication, Las Vegas may have more than its share of people without enough food.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in its annual survey of food security, found that 11.9 million Americans suffered a substantial disruption in their food supply during the year, reflecting an increase of 40 percent since 2000.

    New Mexico was reported to be the second worst state in the nation for food insecurity, being beaten out only by Mississippi.