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Local News

  • Woman, 89, loses home in fire

    A Las Vegas woman whose doors were open to all in need is now in need herself.

    Amalia Montaño, 89, of 1003 Commerce St., lost her home to an electrical fire early Monday. Her daughter and five of her grandchildren were living with her. All escaped injury, but they lost everything, including their home, furniture and clothing.

  • A full agenda

    Other matters that surfaced at Wednesday’s Las Vegas City Council meeting included:

    • Utilities Director Ken Garcia said that since the Stage II water restrictions were imposed Aug. 17, there has been about a 10 percent drop in demand and a slight increase in storage. He said as long as storage continues to increase, there will be no need to go the Stage III restrictions.

  • County commissioners wrestle with Tasers

    San Miguel County Sheriff Benjie Vigil told county commissioners at a meeting Tuesday that he wanted a yes or no vote immediately on standard operating procedures for using Tasers by his deputies.

    But board Chairman David Salazar said he and other board members wanted to table the issue until Vigil had a chance to present his case for Tasers “fully and completely.”

  • City passes RHS parking resolution

    The Las Vegas City Council passed a resolution Wednesday to manage parking around Robertson High School — after much discussion about a detail that had been left out of the plan.

    The resolution designates certain blocks along Fourth and Fifth streets and Friedman and Baca avenues as either residential parking only or no parking areas. Signs will be put up to specify the areas.

  • Official explains why job not advertised

    The local District Court didn’t advertise a supervisor’s position in the court clerk’s office, instead filling it with an employee involved in a nepotism situation.

    Some employees have worked in the court clerk’s office for years, yet they didn’t have an opportunity to apply for the vacant position, which would have been a promotion.

    Rather, the Fourth Judicial District Court filled the position with Michelle Pino, who has served as District Judge Eugenio Mathis’ administrative secretary for a number of years.

  • Parts of conservation law ignored

    The city is considering revisions to its conservation ordinance, but some may wonder if the original has been strictly followed.

    The 2001 ordinance is most known for the stages of increasing water-use restrictions when supplies run low. The city has followed that procedure over the years.

    But other parts of the ordinance have gone by largely unnoticed — such as the portion about educating the community.

  • Rules on legal opinions debated

    The Las Vegas city attorney says that only a City Council majority or the city manager can request a legal opinion from the city attorney.  

    But the provision in the city Governing Body Rules of Procedure, which City Attorney Carlos Quiñones cited, never mentions that the city manager can request an opinion.

    Indeed, it refers only to supplemental opinions, which would come from a law firm other than the city attorney. It says nothing about legal opinions requested of the city attorney himself.

  • 16 wells reported dry near town

    Jack and Betty Thompson of Ojitos Frios have been without well water for more than two weeks. These days, they are relying on rainwater.

    And they aren’t alone. The latest count is 16 households without well water.

    Now residents are looking at options to have water trucked in. And a county commissioner is looking at ways to help.

  • Scrap metal an issue in Mora

    Mora County resident Joseph Weathers is in the business of making money off scrap metal. As such, he said he wants a fair shot at getting such material at the county’s transfer station.

    He said he and others have been able to get old refrigerators, appliances and other items at the station and take them to other places such as Colorado and make money from the scrap metal.

  • E-mails reveal a frustrated Feldman

    The beginning of the year was a turbulent time in city government: The city manager had just resigned without notice, most of the directors were new, and a political realignment was just about to happen.

    Last week, the Optic received more than 100 pages of e-mails involving a quorum of the City Council. For months, the city had refused to turn over these messages, but finally did after the recommendation of the state attorney general.