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Local News

  • Police charge local man in father-in-law’s death

    New Mexico State Police have arrested a Romeroville man on a charge of voluntary manslaughter after he allegedly held his father-in-law in a choke hold.

    State Police spokesman Eric Garcia says officers are investigating the death Friday of 59-year-old Ernest Gutierrez, also of Romeroville.

    Garcia says Gutierrez and his 31-year-old son-in-law, Mica Murray, were fighting at a residence south of Las Vegas.

    Garcia says an ambulance was called to the residence and Gutierrez was pronounced dead later at Alta Vista Regional Hospital.

  • Authorities arrest marijuana grower

    The Region IV Narcotics Task Force and the New Mexico National Guard Aviation Unit teamed up for marijuana eradication recently, conducting fly-over missions of San Miguel and Mora counties.

    Agents from the air located a grow site near Tecolote, a news release stated. Joe F. Griego was arrested by agents on the ground, the release said.

  • Luna charter school nixed by state

    After hearing opposition from area superintendents recently, the state Public Education Commission denied an application for the proposed Luna Charter Academy.  

    Luna was among eight proposed charter schools that did not pass muster during a meeting last week.The commission did approve seven charter schools that included four in Albuquerque and one each in Rio Rancho, Santa Fe and Taos.

  • Charges dropped

    Charges have been dropped against school officials and coaches accused of not reporting a series of attacks at a football camp last year — and at least one victim’s parents, as well as the prosecutor who initially filed the charges, aren’t a bit happy about it.

  • Woman, 89, loses home in fire

    A Las Vegas woman whose doors were open to all in need is now in need herself.

    Amalia Montaño, 89, of 1003 Commerce St., lost her home to an electrical fire early Monday. Her daughter and five of her grandchildren were living with her. All escaped injury, but they lost everything, including their home, furniture and clothing.

  • A full agenda

    Other matters that surfaced at Wednesday’s Las Vegas City Council meeting included:

    • Utilities Director Ken Garcia said that since the Stage II water restrictions were imposed Aug. 17, there has been about a 10 percent drop in demand and a slight increase in storage. He said as long as storage continues to increase, there will be no need to go the Stage III restrictions.

  • County commissioners wrestle with Tasers

    San Miguel County Sheriff Benjie Vigil told county commissioners at a meeting Tuesday that he wanted a yes or no vote immediately on standard operating procedures for using Tasers by his deputies.

    But board Chairman David Salazar said he and other board members wanted to table the issue until Vigil had a chance to present his case for Tasers “fully and completely.”

  • City passes RHS parking resolution

    The Las Vegas City Council passed a resolution Wednesday to manage parking around Robertson High School — after much discussion about a detail that had been left out of the plan.

    The resolution designates certain blocks along Fourth and Fifth streets and Friedman and Baca avenues as either residential parking only or no parking areas. Signs will be put up to specify the areas.

  • Official explains why job not advertised

    The local District Court didn’t advertise a supervisor’s position in the court clerk’s office, instead filling it with an employee involved in a nepotism situation.

    Some employees have worked in the court clerk’s office for years, yet they didn’t have an opportunity to apply for the vacant position, which would have been a promotion.

    Rather, the Fourth Judicial District Court filled the position with Michelle Pino, who has served as District Judge Eugenio Mathis’ administrative secretary for a number of years.

  • Parts of conservation law ignored

    The city is considering revisions to its conservation ordinance, but some may wonder if the original has been strictly followed.

    The 2001 ordinance is most known for the stages of increasing water-use restrictions when supplies run low. The city has followed that procedure over the years.

    But other parts of the ordinance have gone by largely unnoticed — such as the portion about educating the community.