.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • State hospital's second in command dies at 60

    Anthony Martinez, the second in command at the state hospital, died last week. He was 60.

    Martinez, a Tucumcari native, died from complications of H1N1 flu, said Troy Jones, administrator of the New Mexico Behavioral Health Institute.

    Martinez, who died Nov. 25, started with the hospital in 2001 and became clinical director the next year.

  • West debates use of volunteers

    Some West Las Vegas school board members argue that volunteers are needed for athletic programs, while others worry that they have become too influential and overbearing.

    The board members debated the issue before they approved the athletic department’s handbook at a recent meeting.

    Chairwoman Christine Ludi said she was hearing from parents that they were being excluded from volunteering their time.

    “For us to say you’re not worthy enough to volunteer to help with our athletic programs or in the classroom is ridiculous,” Ludi said.

  • City eyes housing needs

    The city has been talking with developers about the possibility of building new public housing, officials said last week.

    But they said no company will get any kind of advantage in the process.

    Three years ago, the city demolished the housing at the old public development along Mills Avenue. Officials have long planned to replace that housing.  

  • Council rejects proposed charter

    The Charter Commission, which has been drafting a new constitution for the city of Las Vegas, has been getting mixed messages from the City Council.

    Everyone involved in the drafting of the charter agrees on one thing: Winners of mayoral and council races must have the support of a majority of voters.

    But they part ways over how to make this happen.

    Last month, the council voted 2-1 in favor of instant runoffs, in which voters rank candidates in a single election. That results in a candidate with a majority, the idea’s supporters contend.

  • Hospital expected to take questions

    The top official at Alta Vista Regional Hospital is expected to appear before the County Commission next week.

    County Manager Les Montoya said that Richard Grogan, the privately run hospital’s CEO, has agreed to attend the county meeting, which is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in the meeting room at the West Las Vegas administration building.  

  • Delay sought for school project

    The $2.9 million Tony Serna Elementary School construction project will go forward — it’s just a question of when.

    The West Las Vegas district has requested to delay the project’s start to May, rather than January, as originally planned.

    Superintendent Jim Abreu said during a recent school board meeting that there were three sites that children would be sent during the year-long renovation. However, board members Caroline Lopez , Kenny Lujan and David Romero were not keen on the plan.

  • Agency works to stop erosion

    Much of your property taxes go to the city, the county, the schools and the state — and residents often see how that money is spent.

    A much smaller portion goes to a less visible entity — Tierra y Montes Soil and Water Conservation District, which covers nearly all of San Miguel County.

    For instance, the owner of an $80,000 house pays around $25 a year to Tierra y Montes.

    So what does that organization do?

    It works to prevent erosion, preserve river habitats and undertake efforts to lessen the chance of wildfires.

  • Vet service takes first passengers

    San Miguel County launched its service to take veterans to appointments at the veterans hospital in Albuquerque more than a month ago.

    But it didn’t have any takers until last week.

    The county took three veterans to the Duke City on Wednesday.

    “We haven’t advertised it as much as we should,” said Wendy Armijo, the county official heading the program.

    She said the county has aired advertisements on local radio stations and that she gave a presentation on the program on Veterans Day.

  • White's Peak action draws only one bid

    SANTA FE -- Only one person submitted a bid for 7,206 acres of state trust land in the White’s Peak area north of Ocaté by Tuesday’s deadline.

    Rancher David Stanley, one of four private landowners involved in a negotiating a complicated land swap, was the lone bidder.

    The swap is aimed at reducing conflict between the public — mostly hunters and outdoor enthusiasts — and landowners in the area, which has become a checkerboard of public and private holdings.

  • Homeless shelter at local church

    A local church is stepping up to provide a shelter for the homeless for the next month.

    Starting more than a week ago, the First Baptist Church, 201 Mountain View Drive, has been hosting a temporary shelter during nights. It will provide this service through Dec. 21.

    Samaritan House, a local nonprofit group that helps the poor, is seeking another church to offer its building for the subsequent month.